Random House: Bringing You the Best in Fiction, Nonfiction, and Children's Books
Authors
Books
Features
Newletters and Alerts

Buy now from Random House

  • The End of Detroit
  • Written by Micheline Maynard
  • Format: Trade Paperback | ISBN: 9780385507707
  • Our Price: $23.00
  • Quantity:
See more online stores - The End of Detroit

Buy now from Random House

  • The End of Detroit
  • Written by Micheline Maynard
  • Format: eBook | ISBN: 9780385511520
  • Our Price: $17.99
  • Quantity:
See more online stores - The End of Detroit

The End of Detroit

    Select a Format:
  • Book
  • eBook

How the Big Three Lost Their Grip on the American Car Market

Written by Micheline MaynardAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Micheline Maynard

eBook

List Price: $17.99

eBook

On Sale: September 23, 2003
Pages: | ISBN: 978-0-385-51152-0
Published by : Crown Business Crown Archetype
The End of Detroit Cover

Bookmark,
Share & Shelve:

  • Add This - The End of Detroit
  • Email this page - The End of Detroit
  • Print this page - The End of Detroit
ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
ABOUT THE AUTHOR ABOUT THE AUTHOR
PRAISE PRAISE
Synopsis

Synopsis

An in-depth, hard-hitting account of the mistakes, miscalculations and myopia that have doomed America’s automobile industry.

In the 1990s, Detroit’s Big Three automobile companies were riding high. The introduction of the minivan and the SUV had revitalized the industry, and it was widely believed that Detroit had miraculously overcome the threat of foreign imports and regained its ascendant position. As Micheline Maynard makes brilliantly clear in THE END OF DETROIT, however, the traditional American car industry was, in fact, headed for disaster. Maynard argues that by focusing on high-profit trucks and SUVs, the Big Three missed a golden opportunity to win back the American car-buyer. Foreign companies like Toyota and Honda solidified their dominance in family and economy cars, gained market share in high-margin luxury cars, and, in an ironic twist, soon stormed in with their own sophisticatedly engineered and marketed SUVs, pickups and minivans. Detroit, suffering from a “good enough” syndrome and wedded to ineffective marketing gimmicks like rebates and zero-percent financing, failed to give consumers what they really wanted—reliability, the latest technology and good design at a reasonable cost. Drawing on a wide range of interviews with industry leaders, including Toyota’s Fujio Cho, Nissan’s Carlos Ghosn, Chrysler’s Dieter Zetsche, BMW’s Helmut Panke, and GM’s Robert Lutz, as well as car designers, engineers, test drivers and owners, Maynard presents a stark picture of the culture of arrogance and insularity that led American car manufacturers astray. Maynard predicts that, by the end of the decade, one of the American car makers will no longer exist in its present form.
Micheline Maynard

About Micheline Maynard

Micheline Maynard - The End of Detroit

Photo © © Fred R. Conrad, the New York Times

Micki Maynard is the Senior Business Correspondent and previous Detroit Bureau Chief for the New York Times, where she has been writing since 2002. She has previously been a staff writer for USA Today, Newsday, U.S. News and World Report, and Reuters, and her writing has also appreared in Fortune Magazine, and the Globe and Mail. She is a regular guest on NPR's Marketplace, the Diane Rehm Show, All Things Considered, and CNBC's Kudlow and Company, and she speaks regularly to business and academic audiences nationwide. She also holds a visiting lecturer position at the University of Michigan, where she has taught at the School of Business Administration and the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy.
Praise

Praise

Acclaim for The End of Detroit

“[A] well-researched and passionate examination of contemporary culture, automotive and otherwise.”
Boston Globe

“Comprehensive . . . Maynard builds a persuasive case with layers of detail.”
—BusinessWeek


“Maynard’s crisply written book coolly analyzes the causes of the latest fall of Detroit.”
The Economist


Your E-Mail Address
send me a copy

Recipient's E-Mail Address
(multiple addresses may be separated by commas)

A personal message: