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Where's the Moon, There's the Moon

Where's the Moon, There's the Moon

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Add This - Where's the Moon, There's the Moon

Written by Dan ChiassonAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Dan Chiasson

  • Format: Hardcover, 88 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Knopf
  • On Sale: February 2, 2010
  • Price: $25.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-307-27217-1 (0-307-27217-6)
Also available as an eBook and a trade paperback.
about this book

These are powerfully original poems about the sweetness and pain of adulthood and fatherhood by the critically acclaimed poet Dan Chiasson.

A child’s improvised game of “Where’s the moon, There’s the moon” is the shaping metaphor for this collection, but adult matters of seeking and finding, loss and recovery, anticipation and desire’s uncertain rewards are at its heart. Chiasson makes poignant use of objects and nature’s givens as correlatives for our human struggles: “Being near me never made anyone a needle,” he writes in “Thread,” and in the poem titled “Tree,” “All day I waited to be blown; / then someone cut me down.” In the title sequence, a multipart poem about fathers and sons, Chiasson describes the ways the gift for being absent, a poet’s gift, is passed from father to son, as he watches his own children sink into the enigmatic silences that mimic his own—silences that he, in turn, connects with his own father’s disappearance from his life.

Chiasson is a poet of great grief and love. In this third book, his voice is more commanding than ever, embracing the notion of how small—yet how rich and significant—are our individual stories in time and space.