Random House Readers Circle
Right Curve
Sidebar topper
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider

Posts Tagged ‘valentine’s day’

Author Feature: 5 Books Robin Black Loves

Monday, February 10th, 2014

Black_Life Drawing Happy Valentine’s Week! We are kicking things off full of love for books and sharing our love for books. Random House Reader’s Circle author Robin Black shares 5 books she loves right now. Her upcoming novel, Life Drawing, is on sale July 2014.

Solace, by Belinda Mckeon

Solace is always now the first novel I recommend, especially to Americans who are less likely to know about it than are people in McKeon’s native Ireland where it won a slew of awards including being named Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book of the Year 2011 at the Irish Book Awards. It is a book about loss (this is going to turn out to be a theme in my list, I’m afraid) but also about gains – if that makes sense. In my own work, I am always trying to convey that balance between grief and the spirit, the determination that makes the unendurable endurable. Set largely in the Irish countryside, the book is also a fascinating look at that milieu, certainly an unfamiliar one to me. Just a great, beautifully written book.

The Sense of an Ending, Julian Barnes

When I recently read The Sense of an Ending, I had no idea the book’s own ending would come so soon. I was reading an e-copy, not tracking pages, and didn’t realize it is well under 200 pages long. I say this, not because its brevity is by itself a virtue – not exactly – but because what Barnes accomplishes in those pages is simply extraordinary. It is a neat puzzle of a book, a kind of clockwork-precise meditation on certain kinds of love, of attachment, of loss (that word again!), of self-delusion, but though an extremely precise, well-structured book, it left me, in all the best ways, with a sense of how messy life is, how full of misunderstanding and crossed wires. It has the feel of a magic trick, a kind of “How on Earth did he do that?” book.

Ancient Light, John Banville

What is remembered and what invented – for any of us? That’s the question at the heart of Ancient Light, and it’s a question that fascinates me, both as a writer and as a person (though those aren’t entirely different things). I think that for many of us, at a certain point in life, you begin rerunning the oldest reels of memory, constructing your own narrative, trying to make sense of it all. Ancient Light, about an “older” actor, newly cast in a role after a time away from his career, explores all these issues of permanency and its opposite when it comes to knowledge of our own distant – maybe not so distant – past.

Someone, Alice McDermott

I enjoyed Someone, enjoyed the story a lot, but I also admit I dip back into this one for the sheer craft of it. The particular way McDermott weaves a present day narrative with a story of the past is wonderfully effective, and, for a writer (since we writers are always on the prowl for new techniques) wonderfully instructive too. But it isn’t at all a technically flashy book, and McDermott’s insights into love, heartache – of many sorts – and also into the role death plays sociologically as well as emotionally within a community, are not only wise, but also very beautiful.

The Understory, Pamela Erens

This is the book I am reading now, soon to be rereleased, after Erens made such an impression with her recent novel The Virgins. The Understory was a critical success when it first appeared some years ago, but never found the audience it deserved. I am reading an advance copy, and so far what strikes me – as I was similarly struck when reading The Virgins – is the intelligence and certainty with which Erens evokes the world she describes. Every sentence is well-turned and accomplishes a lot. Her prose is what people like to call, “muscular,” meaning just that she does a lot with no waste. The pages positively bubble with evocative details. The narrator is a man whose psyche is peculiar – he obsessively or maybe compulsively collects sightings of identical twins, for example – yet, for all his oddity, he is immediately accessible, compelling. Only a couple of chapters in, I have a feeling that this time around a lot more people are going to know and love this book.

What 5 books are you loving right now?? Share with us on our Facebook page.

Jane’s Bookshelf: Favorite Love Stories

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

JVMWhat does a publisher at the world’s biggest publishing house read for pleasure? (And how does she find the time?) Jane von Mehren is the Senior Vice President and Publisher of Trade Paperbacks at the Random House Publishing Group. Every now and then, she’ll be featuring her favorite reads in her Reader’s Circle column, Jane’s Bookshelf—books that she thinks you’ll love, whether you read them solo or with your club! And if you’re on Twitter, you can follower her tweets at @janeatrandom.

In an editor and a publisher’s life, there are certain authors and publications that stand out. For me there was my first acquisition (House of Heroes by Mary La Chapelle), first bestseller (Backlash by Susan Faludi), the first bestseller I didn’t originally acquire (Motherless Daughters by Hope Edelman). It’s sort of embarrassing to realize how well I remember these events from almost two decades ago!

Snow Flower smallHere at Random House, Lisa See is an author who looms large for me in large part because Snow Flower and the Secret Fan was one of the first big paperbacks I published when I came here nearly seven years ago. We moved the paperback up from the traditional 12 months after hardcover publication to 9 months, completely redesigned the jacket, sent Lisa on a huge tour, and did major marketing outreach targeting book clubs and avid fiction readers. The success we shared with that campaign became a calling card for Random House Readers Circle and our trade paperback program. So February 7 was a special day for me: Dreams of Joy went on sale in paperback. I won’t try to describe it since the Los Angeles Times does it better than I ever could: “The scope of the novel is astonishing. . . .See aims her pen at the most vivid aspects of daily life but never loses the sweep of history. In the end, it’s a story with characters who enter a reader’s life, take up residence, and illuminate the myriad decisions and stories that make up human history.” And you may be able to catch Lisa while she is out on tour.

major_pettigrewBeing that it’s near Valentine’s Day, I can’t help but think of some other firsts: first kiss, first love … though I’m not sharing them! Instead here are some of my favorite love stories: Helen Simonson’s Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand combines British wit and charm, a small British village, and two wonderful characters – the Major and Mrs. Ali – who fall in love despite everyone’s disapproval; it’s an endearing, thoroughly grown up romance.

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and SweetSome love stories take place in the midst of momentous events, so that the relationships at their heart take on almost epic proportions: I think of Charles Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities and Sydney Carton’s sacrifice that allows Charles Darney and his lovely Lucie to remain together despite the ravages of the French Revolution. Or how World War II interrupts the young love between Henry and Keiko in Jamie Ford’s Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.

EndlessLoveVaclav&LenaPerhaps it is stories of young love that resonate most with us as readers. I for one can’t forget the angst-ridden romantics that Scott Spencer created with his teenage protagonists in Endless Love. More recently, I adored the young characters at the heart of Haley Tanner’s Vaclav and Lena; theirs is a story not only of love, but also of magic. Need I say more?

As you think of your first Valentine or your favorite love stories, I hope you will share them with me and our Random House Readers Circle community.

Shoe
Bertelsmann Media Worldwide