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Thanksgiving Recipes: Frozen Chocolate Velvet Pie from Carla Buckley

November 22nd, 2014

9780553393736This week, we’ve invited a few of our authors to share their favorite Thanksgiving recipes with you. Whether they’re family tradition or the product of a frantic internet search, we’re excited to hear and share with you what these writers have on their tables on this holiday season. Today, Carla Buckley, author of The Deepest Secret, shares a special recipe for a tasty dessert.

Every year of my childhood, my mother took on preparing Thanksgiving dinner for our family, friends, and a few lucky neighbors, a massive undertaking that spanned a full week. She was a fabulous cook and our house swam in delicious aromas. Each morning, I would wake and run into the kitchen to see what she had prepared during the night while I slept. The one thing we all waited for was her Chocolate Velvet Pie, cooling in the freezer. This is an old-time recipe, from the days when people didn’t count calories or worry about fat grams. To me, it summons back my mother, now long gone, and reminds me what Thanksgiving is all about: family, those we’re born into, and those we make.

Jacquie’s Frozen Chocolate Velvet Pie (8” pie, serves 10-12)

2 egg whites
1/8 teaspoon salt
¼ cup granulated sugar
2 cups finely chopped walnuts
¼ cup white corn syrup
1 T water
1 T vanilla
1 cup semi-sweet chocolate pieces
2/3 cup chilled sweetened condensed milk
1 ½ cups heavy cream

Crust:5292388069_9659658356_m

While oven heats to 400 degrees, beat egg whites to soft peaks with salt. Gradually beat in sugar until stiff. Add nuts. Spread over bottom and up the sides of a greased pie plate. Bake twelve minutes and cool.

Filling:

Bring corn syrup and water to a boil, stirring. Remove from heat, and stir in vanilla and semi-sweet chocolate pieces until melted. Let cool. Reserve 2 tablespoons, and pour the rest into a large bowl. Stir in condensed milk and heavy cream, and beat at low speed until mixture forms soft peaks. Pour into cooled shell and place in freezer until frozen. Remove and decorate with reserved chocolate to form a lattice pattern. Cover with plastic wrap and return to freezer. Keeps up to a month. Allow to soften on counter 25 minutes before serving.

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Thanksgiving Recipe: Cranberry Salad from Darcie Chan

November 21st, 2014

9780345538239This week, we’ve invited a few of our authors to share Thanksgiving staples, family recipes, or dishes that somehow always make it onto their holiday tables! Today’s recipe is from Darcie Chan, author of The Mill River Recluse and The Mill River Redemption.

The beauty of this cranberry salad isn’t just in how fabulous it looks and tastes, but also in the fact that it is best prepared a day ahead of time, before the real crush of cooking gets underway.

Growing up, my mom and two sisters and I would sit around the dining room table the evening before Thanksgiving. We didn’t have an electric chopper back then, so each of us would get a knife and cutting board and start chopping up one of the main ingredients — cranberries, walnuts, celery, or apples. Inevitably, we’d get bored with the work and start telling stories and jokes, which would then degenerate into making faces across the table and otherwise acting like idiots. Once we finally had everything chopped and ready to combine, our faces and sides ached from laughing. My mom usually ended up pulping the oranges (since we hated doing that and she was best at it, anyhow) and getting everything into the pan and then the fridge. Finally, the four of us would totter off to bed, often still giggling, and always happily anticipating snitching some of the finished cranberry salad for breakfast!

Ingredients:

1 can whole berry jellied cranberry sauce
2 large boxes sugar-free cherry Jell-O
2 cups walnuts, chopped
2 apples, peeled and finely chopped
1.5 bags whole fresh cranberries, finely chopped
2 cups celery, finely chopped
Pulp of 2 large oranges

Preparation:Cranberries

Combine all ingredients except for the jellied cranberry sauce and the Jell-O in a large bowl and stir until well-mixed. Set aside.

Boil water for Jell-O. In a glass 9″ x 13″ pan, stir Jell-O powder into boiling water per instructions on the box until Jell-O is completely dissolved. Add the canned cranberry sauce to the Jell-O liquid and stir until it, too, is dissolved.

Add the combined ingredients in the bowl to the liquid in the 9″ x 13″ pan, as well as the remaining water called for in the instructions on the Jell-O box (or as much of the water as will fit in the pan) and stir gently until evenly mixed.

Place pan in refrigerator for several hours until Jell-O mixture is firm and set.

Thanksgiving Recipes: Laura McHugh’s Grandma’s Stuffing

November 19th, 2014

This week, we’ve invited a few of our authors to share their favorite Thanksgiving recipes with you. Whether they’re family tradition or the product of a frantic internet search, we’re excited to hear and share with you what these writers have on their tables on this holiday season. Today, Laura McHugh, author of The Weight of Blood, shares her grandmother’s recipe for stuffing (my personal favorite part of Thanksgiving!).

My grandma passed away just after I graduated from college, and I’ve now lived half of my life without her. That doesn’t seem possible, as she is with me each day in a hundred small ways, andmchugh_grandma[1]especially in the kitchen: her dented measuring cup; the rolling pin with the broken handle.

Every Thanksgiving we make Grandma’s stuffing, and we do our best to get it right. She never wrote down her recipe, so we work from memory. It is a group effort. My sisters and I hover around the stove like a team of surgeons about to perform a risky operation. Our brothers stand back, requesting status updates and begging us not to screw up. We remind each other to be generous with the sage, to mix in the egg with bare hands. We fret over turkey drippings. We always think we won’t have enough bread and we always end up with too much.

When it comes out of the oven, I take a test bite, hoping that it will transport me back to my grandma’s tiny kitchen in Keokuk, Iowa, where she let us tear the bread and crack the eggs. When the stuffing turns out right, there is nothing better. We serve it with reverence, like communion wafers. We rejoice as though we have done something miraculous. We eat the scraps left on our children’s plates—they don’t quite grasp its importance. When it is right, it is more than stuffing; it is a certain kind of magic, like Grandma is still with us at the table.

Recipe: Grandma’s Stuffing

1 loaf of dried or toasted white bread

1 small onion, chopped

1 stalk of celery, chopped

2 eggs

Turkey drippings

Dried sage

Salt and peppermchugh_stuffing[1]

Tear the bread into pieces and place in a baking dish (kids love to help with this part!). Sprinkle a generous amount of sage over the bread. Cook onion and celery until tender. In a mixing bowl,combine cooked onion and celery with two beaten eggs, more sage, and a little salt and pepper. Add this to the bread and mix with your hands. Pour turkey drippings over the stuffing, adding enough to make the bread moist, but not soggy. Feel free to sprinkle on some more sage, because Grandma was right, you can never have too much. Bake approximately 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

Reader’s Guide: Q&A with Laura Hillenbrand

November 14th, 2014

Unbroken MTI

Random House Reader’s Circle: Louie Zamperini is a larger-than-life figure. He enjoyed a measure of fame in his youth—both during his running career and after surviving the POW camps—but was relatively unknown in the second half of the twentieth century. How did you first learn about Louie? When did you realize there was a book in his story?
Laura Hillenbrand: My first book was about the Depression-era racehorse Seabiscuit. While working on it, I pored over 1930s newspapers. One day I was reading a 1938 clipping about the horse when I happened to turn the paper over and find a profile of a young running phenomenon named Louie Zamperini. I started reading. Louie had not yet gone to war, but his story was already so interesting that I jotted his name down in my Seabiscuit research notebook.
Later, I came across Louie’s name again, and this time I learned a little about his wartime odyssey. I was very intrigued, and when I finished writing Seabiscuit: An American Legend, I did some searching, found an address for Louie, and wrote him a letter. He wrote back, I called him, and I found myself in the most fascinating conversation of my life. He told me his story, and I was captivated.
So many elements of Louie’s saga were enthralling, but one in particular hooked me. He told of having experienced almost unimaginable abuse at the hands of his captors, yet spoke without self-pity or bitterness. In fact, he was cheerful, speaking with perfect equanimity. When he finished his story, I had one question: How can you tell of being victimized by such monstrous men, yet not express rage? His response was simple: Because I forgave them.
It was this, more than anything, that hooked me. How could this man forgive the unforgivable? In setting out to write Louie’s biography, I set out to find the answer.

Laura Hillenbrand’s #1 New York Times bestselling book, Unbroken, tells the improbable, inspiring story of Louis Zamperini, childhood delinquent, Olympic runner, and prisoner of war. This Christmas, this unforgettable testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit will premiere as a major motion picture directed by Angelina Jolie. Watch the trailer here, and read our conversation with Laura below!

Random House Reader’s Circle: Louie Zamperini is a larger-than-life figure. He enjoyed a measure of fame in his youth—both during his running career and after surviving the POW camps—but was relatively unknown in the second half of the twentieth century. How did you first learn about Louie? When did you realize there was a book in his story?

Laura Hillenbrand: My first book was about the Depression-era racehorse Seabiscuit. While working on it, I pored over 1930s newspapers. One day I was reading a 1938 clipping about the horse when I happened to turn the paper over and find a profile of a young running phenomenon named Louie Zamperini. I started reading. Louie had not yet gone to war, but his story was already so interesting that I jotted his name down in my Seabiscuit research notebook.

Later, I came across Louie’s name again, and this time I learned a little about his wartime odyssey. I was very intrigued, and when I finished writing Seabiscuit: An American Legend, I did some searching, found an address for Louie, and wrote him a letter. He wrote back, I called him, and I found myself in the most fascinating conversation of my life. He told me his story, and I was captivated.

So many elements of Louie’s saga were enthralling, but one in particular hooked me. He told of having experienced almost unimaginable abuse at the hands of his captors, yet spoke without self-pity or bitterness. In fact, he was cheerful, speaking with perfect equanimity. When he finished his story, I had one question: How can you tell of being victimized by such monstrous men, yet not express rage? His response was simple: Because I forgave them.

It was this, more than anything, that hooked me. How could this man forgive the unforgivable? In setting out to write Louie’s biography, I set out to find the answer.

Read the rest of their conversation here!

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Reader’s Guide: Discussion Questions for Aimless Love by Billy Collins

November 6th, 2014
1. Billy Collins has said, “In a poem you have the greatest imaginative freedom possible in language. You have no allegiance to plot, consistency, plausibility, character development, chronology.” Do you agree or disagree? How do you find yourself reading a book of poetry differently than you do a novel? Did you find yourself creating narrative connections between poems in Aimless Love?
2. What patterns can you identify in Collins’s writing? Are there images, subjects, or themes that you see him returning to again and again? What specific images stood out for you?
3. Collins skillfully moves between many emotional tones in his work, from light-hearted to somber, from ironic to sincere, from astonishment and wonder to remorse and grief. How does he achieve such scope in just a few lines? Find your favorite examples of poems with a range of tones.
4. When reading poetry, do you assume it is the writer speaking? Who else might it be? Discuss the role of autobiography in poetry.
5. Collins has said that in his poems he is “speaking to someone I’m trying to get to fall in love with me.” How does Collins get this idea across on the page?
6. Read “Litany.” Now read “Litany” out loud. Now listen to Collins read “Litany”: (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56Iq3PbSWZY). Finally, watch three-year-old Samuel recite “Litany”: (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVu4Me_n91Y). What did you hear differently? Did your own interpretation of the poem change?
7. Collins has been called “America’s favorite poet.” What do you think defines popularity in poetry? Do you perceive reading poetry as hard work? Did Aimless Love change that perception?
8. Robert Frost said, “A poem begins in delight and ends in wisdom.” Collins hopes that his poems “begin in Kansas and end in Oz.” What do you think each poet means? Do the two statements contradict each other?
9. Collins employs epigraphs of all kinds, including a reference from The Notebooks of Robert Frost in “The Four-Moon Planet” and a line from an article on printing in “Flock.” Did the epigraphs change your reading experience? How? In what other ways does Collins engage with poetry and other literature in his work?
10. Collins wrote his September 11–themed poem, “The Names,” when he was U.S. Poet Laureate of the United States. Do you think poetry as commemoration still serves an important role in society today?
11. Look at the Acknowledgments. Have you read any of those publications? How do you interact with poetry in your everyday life?
12. We speak of the gift of poetry. What does that mean to you? Identify three people in your life and choose a poem from Aimless Love that you would like to share with them.

9780812982671Has your book club ever discussed a book of poetry? By turns playful, ironic, and serious, Collins’s poetry captures the nuances of everyday life while leading the reader into zones of inspired wonder. In the poet’s own words, he hopes that his poems “begin in Kansas and end in Oz.” Touching on the themes of love, loss, joy, and poetry itself, these poems showcase the best work of this “poet of plenitude, irony, and Augustan grace” (The New Yorker). There is plenty to discuss in this lush collection of poems, Collins’ first in nine years. Encourage your book club to try something new, and dive headfirst into Aimless Love:

1. Billy Collins has said, “In a poem you have the greatest imaginative freedom possible in language. You have no allegiance to plot, consistency, plausibility, character development, chronology.” Do you agree or disagree? How do you find yourself reading a book of poetry differently than you do a novel? Did you find yourself creating narrative connections between poems in Aimless Love?

2. What patterns can you identify in Collins’s writing? Are there images, subjects, or themes that you see him returning to again and again? What specific images stood out for you?

3. Collins skillfully moves between many emotional tones in his work, from lighthearted to somber, from ironic to sincere, from astonishment and wonder to remorse and grief. How does he achieve such scope in just a few lines? Find your favorite examples of poems with a range of tones.

4. When reading poetry, do you assume it is the writer speaking? Who else might it be? Discuss the role of autobiography in poetry.

5. Collins has said that in his poems he is “speaking to someone I’m trying to get to fall in love with me.” How does Collins get this idea across on the page?

6. Read “Litany.” Now read “Litany” out loud. Now listen to Collins read “Litany.” Finally, watch three-year-old Samuel recite “Litany.” What did you hear differently? Did your own interpretation of the poem change?

7. Collins has been called “America’s favorite poet.” What do you think defines popularity in poetry? Do you perceive reading poetry as hard work? Did Aimless Love change that perception?

8. Robert Frost said, “A poem begins in delight and ends in wisdom.” Collins hopes that his poems “begin in Kansas and end in Oz.” What do you think each poet means? Do the two statements contradict each other?

9. Collins employs epigraphs of all kinds, including a reference from The Notebooks of Robert Frost in “The Four-Moon Planet” and a line from an article on printing in “Flock.” Did the epigraphs change your reading experience? How? In what other ways does Collins engage with poetry and other literature in his work?

10. Collins wrote his September 11–themed poem, “The Names,” when he was U.S. Poet Laureate of the United States. Do you think poetry as commemoration still serves an important role in society today?

11. Look at the Acknowledgments. Have you read any of those publications? How do you interact with poetry in your everyday life?

12. We speak of the gift of poetry. What does that mean to you? Identify three people in your life and choose a poem from Aimless Love that you would like to share with them.

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