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1491
Una nueva historia de la Americas antes de Colon
Written by Charles C. Mann
Translated by Martin Martinez-Lage


1491
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Category: History - Native American; History - Expeditions & Discoveries; Political Science - Colonialism & Post-Colonialism
Imprint: Siete Cuentos
Format: Trade Paperback
Pub Date: August 2013
Price: $22.95
Can. Price: $22.95
ISBN: 978-1-60980-515-9 (1-60980-515-1)
Pages: 640
Also available as a hardcover.



 
NOW IN A SPANISH LANGUAGE EDITION

Traditionally, we are taught that the first inhabitants of America entered the continent through the Bering Strait twelve thousand years before the arrival of Columbus. It was assumed that they were small and nomadic bands, and living without altering the earth. But during the last thirty years, archaeologists and anthropologists have shown that these assumptions, like others that also held for some time, were wrong.

In a book as amazing as persuasive, Charles C. Mann reveals novel findings such as that in 1491 there were more people in America than in Europe, that some cities like Tenochtitlan, had a larger population than any contemporary city at the time, in addition to water, beautiful botanical gardens and immaculately clean streets, that the prosperity of the first American cities reached before the Egyptians built the pyramids, that Mexico’s pre-Columbian Indians grew corn by a process so sophisticated that the journal Science recently described it as “the first feat, and perhaps most, in the field of genetic engineering,” or that Native Americans transformed the land so completely that Europeans arrived in a continent whose landscape was shaped by humans.

Charles C. Mann sheds new light on methods used to arrive at these new visions of pre-Columbian America, and about how they affect our understanding of history and our comprehension of the environment. 1491 is a gripping tale of various research and scientific revelations that will change radically magnitude preimera way we see pre-Columbian America.





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