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Vintage Hughes

Written by Langston Hughes

Vintage Hughes
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Category: Poetry - Single Author - American; Fiction - Literary
Imprint: Vintage
Format: Trade Paperback
Pub Date: January 2004
Price: $10.95
Can. Price: $12.95
ISBN: 978-1-4000-3402-4 (1-4000-3402-7)
Pages: 208



 
“Langston Hughes is a titanic figure in 20th-century American literature…a powerful interpreter of the American experience.” —The Philadelphia Inquirer

Langston Hughes’s mastery of the African American vernacular and his passionate vision of the world resonate in this generous selection of his poems including “The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” “I, Too,” “The Weary Blues,” “America,” “Let America Be America Again,” “Dream Variations,” “Young Sailor,” “Afro-American Fragment,” “Scottsboro,” “The Negro Mother,” “Good Morning Revolution,” “I Dream a World,” “The Heart of Harlem,” “Freedom Train,” “Song for Billie Holliday,” Nightmare Boogie,” “Africa,” “Black Panther,” “Birmingham Sunday,” and “UnAmerican Investigators”; and three stories from The Ways of White Folks: “Cora Unashamed,” “Home,” and “The Blues I’m Playing.”



ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 
Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was a writer of astonishing range. Poetry, fiction, plays, autobiography, essays, libretti for operas and Broadway musicals, and cantatas—work streamed from his desk. It is as a poet though, that he is best known, and his place at the center of Harlem Renaissance was enormously influential. He was the first African-American to write civil-rights protest poetry, as well as the first to use jazz and the blues as a basis for a literary style. Few poets have ever potrayed so vividly the black experience, its triumphs and travails, and in a language that cunningly dramatizes the folk vernacular. Hughes was born in Missouri, worked as a manual laborer and traveled the world—the better, in the end, to know so intimately the realities of urban life for the displaced and rootless. He wrote with eloquence, humor and a deep humanity.

“A poet,” he once wrote, “is a human being. Each human being must live within his time, with and for his people, and within the boundaries of his country.” Hughes wrote of the drama of his time with a sense of truth that continues to startle and move.





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