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I May Be Wrong but I Doubt It

Written by Charles Barkley
Introduction by Michael Wilbon


I May Be Wrong but I Doubt It
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Category: Sports & Recreation - Basketball; Biography & Autobiography; Biography & Autobiography - Personal Memoirs
Imprint: Random House Trade Paperbacks
Format: Trade Paperback
Pub Date: October 2003
Price: $16.00
Can. Price: $19.00
ISBN: 978-0-8129-6628-2 (0-8129-6628-7)
Pages: 288
Also available as an eBook.



 
"Barkley does an artful job of discussing his interpretation and influence on apartheid, while at the same time talking about the details of the NBA that make him a quasi-expert on the current and future state of professional basketball. Some obscenities scattered throughout the book but do not detract from its readability or a positive recommendation for purchase."
Kliatt

Charles Barkley has never been shy about expressing his opinions. Michael Jordan once said that we all want to say the things that Barkley says, but we don’t dare. But even die-hard followers of the all-time NBA great, the star of TNT’s Inside the NBA and CNN’s TalkBack Live, will be astonished by just how candid and provocative he is in this book—and just how big his ambitions are.

Though he addresses weighty issues with a light touch and prefers to stir people to think by making them laugh, there’s nothing Charles Barkley shies away from here—not race, not class, not big money, not scandal, not politics, not personalities, nothing. “Early on,” says Washington Post columnist and ESPN talk show host Michael Wilbon in his Introduction, “Barkley made his peace with mixing it up, and decided the consequences were very much worth it to him. And that makes him as radically different in these modern celebrity times as a 6-foot-4-inch power forward.”

If there’s one thing Charles Barkley knows, it’s the crying need for honest, open discussion in this country—the more uncomfortable the subject, the more necessary the dialogue. And if the discussion leader can be as wise, irreverent, (occasionally) profane and (consistently) funny as Charles Barkley, so much the better. Like Molly Ivins or Bill O’Reilly, Charles Barkley is utterly his own thinker, and what he says comes from deep reflection.



ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 
Charles Barkley is a studio analyst for TNT’s Inside the NBA, a regular contributor to CNN’s TalkBack Live and a frequent color commentator. Named one of the fifty greatest NBA players of all time, he was selected to eleven All-Star teams and won the NBA’s MVP award in 1993. He lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Michael Wilbon is a Washington Post sports columnist and the cohost, with Tony Kornheiser, of the ESPN show Pardon the Interruption. He lives outside Washington, D.C.





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