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MLK
A Celebration in Word and Image
Written by Martin Luther King, Jr.
Edited by Bob Adelman
Introduction by Charles Johnson


MLK
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Category: Social Science - African-American Studies; Political Science - Civil Rights; Art - Art & Politics
Imprint: Beacon Press
Format: Hardcover
Pub Date: October 2011
Price: $15.00
Can. Price: $17.00
ISBN: 978-0-8070-0316-9 (0-8070-0316-6)
Pages: 64



 
A stunning collection of photographs of and quotations by Dr. King compiled by renowned photojournalist Bob Adelman.

A striking collection of twenty-nine black-and-white images combined with powerful quotations by Dr. King, MLK: A Celebration in Word and Image is a photo-biography of one of America’s greatest figures. Here we see King in all his aspects: as son and student, husband and father, preacher and courageous leader of the civil rights movement, martyr for the cause of racial justice and, finally, American icon. Award-winning photojournalist Bob Adelman intimately captures King’s background, from his comfortable middle-class upbringing in Atlanta and his public outings with his wife, Coretta, to his steady ascendance as a forceful preacher thrust into prominence during the civil rights era. The triumph of King’s “I Have a Dream” speech is beautifully detailed, but we also see a weary King, weighed down by assassination attempts, harassment, inner-city riots, and the Vietnam War. Toward the end, King displays an eerie sense of calm in a photo taken at the Mason Hall in Memphis the night before his murder, where he declared that he’d “been to the mountaintop.”





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