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Treasure Island

Written by Robert Louis Stevenson
Introduction by David Cordingly


Treasure Island
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Category: Fiction - Classics
Imprint: Modern Library
Format: Trade Paperback
Pub Date: April 2001
Price: $8.00
Can. Price: $10.00
ISBN: 978-0-375-75682-5 (0-375-75682-5)
Pages: 240
Also available as an unabridged audio CD, unabridged audiobook download, eBook, hardcover, paperback and a trade paperback.



 
Robert Louis Stevenson's cherished, unforgettable adventure magically captures the thrill of a sea voyage and a treasure hunt through the eyes of its teenage protagonist, Jim Hawkins. Crossing the Atlantic in search of the buried cache, Jim and the ship’s crew must brave the elements and a mutinous charge led by the quintessentially ruthless pirate Long John Silver. Brilliantly conceived and splendidly executed, it is a novel that has seized the imagination of generations of adults and children alike. And as David Cordingly points out in his Introduction, “Treasure Island is also the best and most influential of all the stories about pirates.”

David Cordingly is the author of Under the Black Flag and Women Sailors and Sailors' Women. He lives in Sussex, England.



ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 
Robert Louis Stevenson, a versatile and prolific writer best remebered for his novels of romantic adventure, was born in Edinburgh on November 13, 1850. His first full-length book, An Inland Voyage (1878), grew out of a canoe trip he took through Belgium and northern France; a later tour through the wilds of southern France produced Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes (1879). Stevenson journeyed to San Francisco in 1879 to marry Fanny Osbourne, an American divorcée ten years his senior. The Silverado Squatters (1883) recalls the couple's eccentric honeymoon at an abandoned silver mind on Mount Saint Helena.

He went on to write ghost stories, medieval romances, moral allegories, tales of psychological horror, and fables drawn from Scottish folklore. In 1882 he brought out New Arabian Nights, an extravagant series of adventures that pay tribute to one of the favorite books of his childhood. The publication of Treasure Island in 1883 brought Stevenson enormous acclaim. Written as an entertainment for his twelve-year-old stepson, the rousing tales of pirates and buried treasure proved universally popular. Stevenson soon enhanced his reputation with The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). A few months later, in a burst of creative energy, Stevenson completed Kidnapped (1886). Set in the Scottish Highlands during the aftermath of the Jacobite rebellion of 1745, this classic of high adventure interweaves the drama of Scottish history with the psychological moral growth of its adolescent hero, David Balfour. Stevenson subsequently turned out three more tales embedded in the fierce loyalites and violent enmities of Scottish history: The Master of Ballantrae (1889), Catriona (1893), and Weir Hermiston (1896). Though perhaps best known for his fiction, Stevenson was also a celebrated essayist as well as a popular poet.

In 1888 Stevenson set sail from San Francisco for the South Pacific, where he spent the last six years of his life. In the South Seas (1896), a posthumously issued travelogue, vividly recounts his journey there. Robert Louis Stevenson died of a cerebral hemorrhage at his estate in Vaililma, Somoa, on December 3, 1894.





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