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Lao-Tzu: Te-Tao Ching

Written by Robert G.Henricks

Lao-Tzu: Te-Tao Ching .

Category: Fiction - Literary; Fiction - Classics; Fiction - Psychological
Imprint: Ballantine Books
Format: Trade Paperback
Pub Date: June 1992
Price: $14.00
Can. Price: $17.00
ISBN: 978-0-345-37099-0 (0-345-37099-6)
Pages: 320
Also available as an eBook.



 
Translated and with an Introduction and Commentary by Robert G. Henricks. In 1973, an excavation at a nobles tomb in Ma-wang-tui, China, uncovered a collection of ancient Chinese brush-written silk texts buried in 168 B.C.   These texts included some of  most ancient versions of some very well known and some long lost cornerstones of Chinese culture, philosophy and military strategy.

These manuscripts are more than five centuries older than any other known and they correct many defects of later versions: their grammar and vocabulary frequently make the classic easier to understand; lost lines are restored; some sections follow a more logical sequence. Such differences make it necessary to reevaluate traditional interpretations of the Te-Tao Ching, and Professor Henricks has done this in an extensive commentary to his excellent new translation based on the recently discovered Ma-wang-tui texts. In addition, Professor Henricks has provided an introduction that explains the basics of Taoism and discusses the many other important finds from Ma-wang-tui.

"Professor Henricks' new volume has two special merits...One is that he succinctly explains the most recent discoveries in texts of the famous classic by "Lao-tzu."...The second merit of the Henricks' translation is its sophistication and simplicity...[Mr. Henricks] presents a version of each line which makes comparative sense out of phraseology that to some translators has seemed incomprehensible and inscrutable."
--John K. Fairbank, Francis Lee Higginson Professor of History, Emeritus, Harvard University





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