.
book book
Home awards catalogs newsletter calendar resources exam about
.



Search the Site
.


Enter keywords, ISBN, author, or book title

 
.
Search the Site

Art
Art
College Planning
Education and Teaching
Language and Literature
Foriegn Language Instruction
Performing Arts
Reference
Science and Mathematics
Social Studies
Test Prep
Writer's Workshop

Search the Site
.


Sign-up for the High School Newsletter:
   

.
Search the Site

. author profiles

Joan Jacobs Brumberg

Joan Jacobs Brumberg is the award-winning author of Fasting Girls: The History of Anorexia Nervosa. She is a Stephen H. Weiss Professor at Cornell University, where she holds a unique appointment teaching in the fields of history, human development, and women's studies. Her research and sensitive writing about American women and girls have been recognized by the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the MacDowell Colony. She lives in Ithaca, New York.



"Brumberg writes beautifully: her generous use of direct quotes from girls' diaries makes this an interesting, lively, and moving account of girls'... Read More

.



author bookshelf SORT BY: on AUTHOR | off TITLE | off PUB DATE
dots





The Body Project
Written by Joan Jacobs Brumberg
Vintage | Trade Paperback | September 1998
$16.00/18.00(Canada) | 978-0-679-73529-8 (0-679-73529-1)

"Timely and sympathetic . . . a work of impassioned advocacy."         --People

A hundred years ago, women were lacing themselves into corsets and teaching their daughters to do the same. The ideal of the day, however, was inner beauty: a focus on good deeds and a pure heart. Today American women have... Read more






Fasting Girls
Written by Joan Jacobs Brumberg
Vintage | Trade Paperback | October 2000
$16.95/18.95(Canada) | 978-0-375-72448-0 (0-375-72448-6)

Winner of four major awards, this updated edition of Joan Jacobs Brumberg's Fasting Girls, presents a history of women's food-refusal dating back as far as the sixteenth century. Here is a tableau of female self-denial: medieval martyrs who used starvation to demonstrate religious devotion, "wonders of science" whose families capitalized on... Read more





.
.
.
.
.
.