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  • Just So Stories
  • Written by Rudyard Kipling
  • Format: Hardcover | ISBN: 9780679417972
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  • Just So Stories
  • Written by Rudyard Kipling
    Read by Jim Weiss
  • Format: Unabridged Audiobook Download | ISBN: 9780307916099
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Read by Jim Weiss
On Sale: May 24, 2011
ISBN: 978-0-307-91609-9
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Synopsis

Synopsis

A dozen fables by one of the world’s great storytellers.
 
The twelve magical JUST SO STORIES tell, how the leopard got his spots? Why the rhinoceros  has his wrinkly skin? Why is a kangaroo very fast on land? Why won't cats come when they're called? And, how one curious elephant with a nose for trouble changed the lives of all elephants everywhere? Many of the tales are origin stories, explaining how an animal came to be the way it is. These delightful tales will hold the listener spellbound.

Rudyard Kipling

About Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling - Just So Stories
Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay, India to British parents on December 30, 1865. In 1871, Rudyard and his sister, Trix, aged three, were left to be cared for by a couple in Southsea, England. Five years passed before he saw his parents again. His sense of desertion and despair were later expressed in his story “Baa Baa, Black Sheep” (1888), in his novel The Light that failed (1890), and his autobiography, Something of Myself (1937). As late as 1935 Kipling still spoke bitterly of the “House of Desolation” at Southsea: “I should like to burn it down and plough the place with salt.”

At twelve he entered a minor public school, the United Services College at Westward Ho, North Devon. In Stalky and CO. (1899) the myopic Beetle is a self-caricature, and the days at Westward Ho are recalled with mixed feelings. At sixteen, eccentric and literary, Kipling sailed to India to become a journalist. His Indian experiences led to seven volumes of stories, including Soldiers Three (1888) and Wee Willie Winkie (1888).

At twenty-four he returned to England and quickly tuned into a literary celebrity. In London he became close friends with an American, (Charles) Wolcott Balestier, with whom he collaborated on what critics called a “dime store novel.” Wolcott died suddenly in 1891, and a few weeks later Kipling married Wolcott’s sister, Caroline. The newlyweds settled in Brattleboro, Vermont, where Kipling wrote The Jungle Book (1895), and most of Captains Courageous (1897). By this time Kipling’s popularity and financial success were enormous.

In 1899 the Kiplings settled in Sussex, England, where he wrote some of his best books: Kim (1901), Just So Stories (1902), and Puck of Pooks Hill (1906). In 1907 he received the Nobel Prize for literature. By the time he died, on January 18 1936, critical opinion was deeply divided about his writings, but his books continued to be read by thousands, and such unforgettable poems and stories as ”Gunga Din,” “If,” “The Man Who Would Be King,” and “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” have lived on in the consciousness of succeeding generations.

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