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  • Guns, Germs, and Steel
  • Written by Jared Diamond
    Read by Doug Ordunio
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  • Guns, Germs, and Steel
  • Written by Jared Diamond
    Read by Doug Ordunio
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Guns, Germs, and Steel

The Fates of Human Societies

Written by Jared DiamondAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Jared Diamond
Read by Doug OrdunioAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Doug Ordunio

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On Sale: June 07, 2011
ISBN: 978-0-307-93242-6
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Read by Doug Ordunio
On Sale: January 18, 2011
ISBN: 978-0-307-93243-3
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Synopsis

Synopsis

Why did Eurasians conquer, displace, or decimate Native Americans, Australians, and Africans, instead of the reverse? Evolutionary biologist Jared Diamond stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history by revealing the environmental factors actually responsible for history’s broadest patterns.

The story begins 13,000 years ago, when Stone Age hunter-gatherers constituted the entire human population. Around that time, the paths of development of human societies on different continents began to diverge greatly. Early domestication of wild plants and animals in the Fertile Crescent, China, Mesoamerica, the Andes, and other areas gave peoples of those regions a head start. Only societies that advanced beyond the hunter-gatherer stage acquired a potential for developing writing, technology, government, and organized religions—as well as those nasty germs and potent weapons of war. It was those societies, that expanded to new homelands at the expense of other peoples. The most familiar examples involve the conquest of non-European peoples by Europeans in the last 500 years, beginning with voyages in search of precious metals and spices, and often leading to invasion of native lands and decimation of native inhabitants.
Jared Diamond

About Jared Diamond

Jared Diamond - Guns, Germs, and Steel
Jared Diamond is a professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. The recipient of numerous awards, he has published more than two hundred articles in such prestigious magazines as Discover and Nature.

  • Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond
  • June 07, 2011
  • Social Science
  • Random House Audio
  • $25.00
  • 9780307932426

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