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  • Driver's Ed
  • Written by Caroline B. Cooney
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  • Driver's Ed
  • Written by Caroline B. Cooney
  • Format: eBook | ISBN: 9780307818881
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Driver's Ed

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Written by Caroline B. CooneyAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Caroline B. Cooney

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List Price: $6.99

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On Sale: August 29, 2012
Pages: 208 | ISBN: 978-0-307-81888-1
Published by : Delacorte Books for Young Readers RH Childrens Books
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ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
ABOUT THE AUTHOR ABOUT THE AUTHOR
PRAISE & AWARDS PRAISE & AWARDS
READER'S GUIDE READER'S GUIDE
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fiction (18) young adult (14) ya (12) death (11) driving (8) teen (7)
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Synopsis

Synopsis

Driver’s Ed was like so many things in school. If the parents only knew . . .
Caroline B. Cooney|Author Q&A

About Caroline B. Cooney

Caroline B. Cooney - Driver's Ed

Photo © Jane Feldman

“What more can life hold, than to know that because of your story, somebody out there has decided to read again!”—Caroline B. Cooney

Caroline B. Cooney's books have received several honors, including an IRA–CBC Children's Choice and being named an ALA Best Book for Young Adults.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Award-winning author Caroline B. Cooney knows what young adults like to read. In fact, Cooney’s all-time favorite fan letter came from a 12-year-old girl who hated reading. But after being forced to read one of Cooney’s books, the girl admitted it had not been a waste of time and had even been enjoyable. “And so,” wrote the girl, “I have come to an important decision. I am writing to tell you that I have decided to read a second book.”

Caroline Cooney was born in 1947 and grew up in Old Greenwich, Connecticut. This prolific author was always ambitious, and as a youth, loved school and was involved in many different activities. Cooney was also an avid reader and recalls that series books such as The Hardy Boys and Cherry Ames were her favorites. These characters had a big influence on her life, and in fact, she says that “Cherry Ames, Student Nurse was my reason to go to nursing school in Boston later in life.”

Cooney began writing in college. She professes,“I love writing and do not know why it is considered such a difficult, agonizing profession. I love all of it, thinking up the plots, getting to know the kids in the story, their parents, backyards, pizza toppings.”

Cooney is a master of mixing spellbinding suspense with thought-provoking insight into teenagers’ lives. One of her most popular books is The Face on the Milk Carton—the gripping story of a young girl who discovers that the picture of a missing child on a milk carton is actually a picture of herself. After writing this book, Cooney received hundreds of letters from readers who were bothered by the ending. “It wasn’t that they didn’ t like the ending, it was that they wanted some kind of resolution. Some said I should have written another chapter.” However, Cooney says she liked leaving the reader worrying about the character just as they would a real person. But one day, her daughter, Sayre, had an idea for a sequel that was so good, Cooney had to write it. The book that evolved was called Whatever Happened to Janie? Continuing where that novel leaves off, Cooney explores the themes of betrayal and peer pressure in The Voice on the Radio. Concluding the Janie Quartet is What Janie Found, in which Cooney masterfully spins a suspenseful story of family secrets that will have readers captivated until the very last word.

Cooney’s novel Burning Up explores the destructive nature of hatred, the crime of indifference, and the power of accepting love and responsibility.

In The Ransom of Mercy Carter, Cooney looks at an actual historic event that had been virtually unexplored in literature for young people. During a 1704 Indian attack on the Deerfield, Massachusetts, settlement, Mercy Carter is separated from her family and taken to a Kahnawake Indian village in Canada. As she awaits ransom, she discovers that the “savages” have traditions and family life that in time become her own.

Cooney completed her Time Travel Quartet with For All Time. In her novel Goddess of Yesterday, Cooney brings ancient Greece to life through careful research and master storytelling.

Most recently Cooney's Diamonds in the Shadow was named a 2008 ALA/YALSA Quick Pick and was a nominee for the Edgar Allen Poe Awards. Her latest gripping thriller, If the Witness Lied, details how love, devotion, and forgiveness make resilience—and recovery—possible.


AUTHOR FUN FACTS

Born: May 10 in Geneva, New York
Education: Greenwich, CT schools and various colleges
Residence: Westbrook, CT
Children: Louisa, Sayre (rhymes with fair), Harold
Inspiration for writing: I love a good story. I love to make things up.
Favorite hobbies: I read a lot. I buy books. I'm in a library (I use several) or a bookstore almost every day because I have to be around other people's books, too. I sing in several choirs, or play the piano for them.
Favorite foods: I'm omnivorous.
Favorite books: I read series books: Cherry Ames, Student Nurse, was the reason I went to nursing school. But my favorite series, and the only one I saved, was Magic by the Lake by Edward Eager.


PRAISE

IF THE WITNESS LIED

"Cooney's new psychologically penetrating page-turner immediately grabs readers then hangs on tight up to its satisfying conclusion."—Kirkus

"Anchored by a poignant sibling reunion, this family-drama-turned-thriller will have readers racing, heart in throat, to reach the conclusion." —Horn Book


DIAMONDS IN THE SHADOW

"Crackling language and nailbiting cliffhangers provide an easy way into the novel's big ideas, transforming topics that can often seem distant and abstract into a grippingly immediate reading experience." —Starred, Publishers Weekly

GODDESS OF YESTERDAY
“Characters from the Iliad, the Odyssey, and much of Greek tragedy make appearances in Anaxandra’ s tale, one that is as vivid as her red-gold hair. Teen readers will be mesmerized.”—Starred, Kirkus Reviews

“A compulsively readable story and may well lead readers to other Greek myths.” —Starred, Publishers Weekly

AMONG FRIENDS
“Readers will respond to the author’s candid view of friendship with its intense bonding, rivalry and sudden, surprising meanness.”—Booklist


BOTH SIDES OF TIME
"Not only a love story and a time-travel fantasy, but also a provocative and powerful examination of women, marriage, and relationships in two centuries.”—School Library Journal


BURNING UP
“Convincingly depicted and . . . compellingly chronicled.”—Starred, The Bulletin

"This thought-provoking story has a powerful message, effortlessly woven into the ordinary trappings of a teenager’s life.”—Kirkus Reviews


DRIVER’S ED
“A wrenching, breathlessly paced plot and an adrenaline-charged romance make Cooney’s latest novel nearly impossible to put down.”—Starred, Publishers Weekly

“Poignant.”—Starred, Booklist


THE FACE ON THE MILK CARTON
“Absorbing and convincing. Strong characterizations and suspenseful, impeccably paced action add to this novel’s appeal.”—Publishers Weekly

“A real page-turner.”—Kirkus Reviews


THE RANSOM OF MERCY CARTER
“Gripping and thought provoking.”—Publishers Weekly


WHATEVER HAPPENED TO JANIE?
“The power and nature of love is wrenchingly illustrated throughout this provocative novel. . . . The emotions of its characters remain excruciatingly real.”—Starred, Publishers Weekly

“A gripping sequel to The Face on the Milk Carton. . . The gut-wrenching circumstances in which the characters find themselves are honestly conveyed.”—Booklist


THE VOICE ON THE RADIO
“[Cooney] has taken this novel to extraordinary heights.”—Starred, School Library Journal

“Readers of Cooney’s addictive The Face on the Milk Carton and Whatever Happened to Janie? can start licking their chops.”—Starred, Publishers Weekly

Author Q&A

Caroline Cooney was born in 1947 and grew up in Old Greenwich, Connecticut. An excellent student and ambitious youth, she loved school and was involved in many different activities. By the time she was in tenth grade, Cooney played the piano for musical productions, directed a choir, and had a job as a church organist. Always an avid reader, Cooney often read series books such as The Hardy Boys and Cherry Ames. These characters had a big influence on her life and in fact, she says "Cherry Ames, Student Nurse, was my reason to go to nursing school in Boston later in life."
Coooney graduated from Greenwich High School in 1965 and attended various colleges, where she studied music, art, and English. It was in college that she began writing, and discovered a talent and joy in what would become an award-winning writing career. Cooney professes, "I love writing and do not know why it is considered such a difficult, agonizing profession. I love all of it, thinking up the plots, getting to know the kids in the story, their parents, backyards, pizza toppings."
Cooney's love of writing for young adults is clearly demonstrated in her numerous celebrated novels including: Driver's Ed (An ALA Best Book for Young Adults, an ALA Quick Pick for Young Adults, and a Booklist Editors' Choice), Among Friends (A New York Public Library Books for the Teen Age), Twenty Pageants Later (An ALA Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers), and the time travel novels, Both Sides of Time and Out of Time. She is a master of mixing spellbinding suspense with thought-provoking insight into teenagers' lives.
Among Cooney's most popular books are the bestselling novels The Face on the Milk Carton, Whatever Happened to Janie? and The Voice on the Radio. These gripping novels tell the story of Janie Johnson, a young girl who recognizes herself in a picture of a missing child on a milk carton, and subsequently unravels a complicated history of abduction, fear and deceit. To satisfy the hundreds of fans wanting to know more, Cooney concluded Janie's captivating story with What Janie Found, a gripping novel of betrayal.
author fun facts
Born: May 10 in Geneva, New York
Education: Greenwich, CT schools and various colleges
Residence:
Westbrook, CT
Children: Louisa, Sayre (rhymes with fair), Harold
Inspiration for writing: I love a good story. I love to make things up.
Favorite. . . hobbies: I read a lot. I buy books. I'm in a library (I use several) or a bookstore almost every day
because I have to be around other people's books, too. I sing in several choirs, or play the piano for them.
. . . foods: I'm omnivorous.
. . . books: I read series books: Cherry Ames, Student Nurse, was the reason I went to nursing school. But my favorite series, and the only one I saved, was Magic by the Lake by Edward Eager.

Praise | Awards

Praise

“A wrenching, breathlessly paced plot and an adrenaline-charged romance make Cooney’s latest novel nearly impossible to put down. . . . This modern-day morality tale is as convincing as it is irresistible.”—Publishers Weekly, Starred

“A poignant, realistic novel, with nicely drawn characters.”—Booklist, Starred

An ALA Best Book for Young Adults

An ALA Quick Pick

A Booklist Children’s Editors’ Choice

Awards

WINNER 1997 Pacific Northwest Young Readers Choice Award
WINNER 1997 Washington Evergreen Young Adult Book Award
WINNER 1997 New Jersey Garden State Children's Book Award
WINNER 1997 Tennessee Volunteer State Book Award
WINNER 1996 Texas Lone Star Reading List
WINNER 1995 ALA Best Books for Young Adults
Teachers Guide

Teacher's Guide



ABOUT THIS BOOK

Getting a driver's license is the one thing that would make Remy's and Morgan's lives nearly perfect. And it seems as if it's going to be easy and fun. After all, Mr. Fielding, the Driver's Ed teacher, thinks his course is a joke. With their already licensed friend, Nickie Budie, Remy and Morgan take the stop sign at the corner of Warren and Cherry Roads. When this action has fatal consequences, they are forced to deal with death, guilt, and the responses of their friends and families. Though there are no easy answers to their dilemmas, the teenagers struggle to do the right thing in the face of their crime. This powerful story of a prank gone awry will leave teenagers grappling for solutions to tough issues.

ABOUT THIS AUTHOR

Caroline Cooney was born in 1947 and grew up in Old Greenwich, Connecticut. An excellent student and ambitious youth, she loved school and was involved in many different activities. By the time she was in tenth grade, Cooney played the piano for musical productions, directed a choir, and had a job as a church organist. Always an avid reader, Cooney often read series books such as The Hardy Boys and Cherry Ames. These characters had a big influence on her life and in fact, she says "Cherry Ames, Student Nurse, was my reason to go to nursing school in Boston later in life."

Cooney graduated from Greenwich High School in 1965 and attended various colleges, where she studied music, art, and English. It was in college that she began writing, and discovered a talent and joy in what would become an award-winning writing career. Cooney professes, "I love writing and do not know why it is considered such a difficult, agonizing profession. I love all of it, thinking up the plots, getting to know the kids in the story, their parents, backyards, pizza toppings."

Cooney's love of writing for young adults is clearly demonstrated in her numerous celebrated novels including: Driver's Ed (An ALA Best Book for Young Adults, an ALA Quick Pick for Young Adults, and a Booklist Editors' Choice), Among Friends (A New York Public Library Books for the Teen Age), Twenty Pageants Later (An ALA Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers), and the time travel novels, Both Sides of Time and Out of Time. She is a master of mixing spellbinding suspense with thought-provoking insight into teenagers' lives.

TEACHING IDEAS

Using Driver's Ed in the Classroom

Pre-Reading Activity

Provide a copy of your state's Driver Education manual for the class. Allow students to peruse the manual thoroughly. Are there any advantages for teenagers and their families that come from taking Driver's Ed? Have students make a chart of the requirements for obtaining a license in your state. How old do you need to be? What kinds of tests do you need to pass? What skills must be mastered for the driving test? What happens if you fail the written test, the driving test, or both? Display the chart in the room, and refer to it as you study the novel.

Thematic Connections

Responsibility -- In the novel, Mr. Fielding, the Driver's Ed teacher, is described as "merely there" (page 8). Find other examples in the book of Mr. Fielding and the students as "merely there." To what degree, if any, is Mr. Fielding responsible for the behavior of Morgan and Remy? How does the tragic death of Denise Thompson cause him to change? Ask students to think of the best teacher they have ever had. Have them brainstorm the traits that made that person a good teacher. Are the traits based purely upon the teacher's knowledge of the subject matter? What responsibilities and moral obligations do teachers have that people in other professions don't have? To what degree might teachers influence the personal lives of their pupils?

Acceptance -- Morgan and Remy notice an unusual traffic sign which reads "Thickly Settled." Consider the message of the sign in relationship to Morgan's and Remy's lives. How does the plot of the story "thicken" after they take the sign? At the story's end, in what way are the conflicts thickly settled? Have students create a sign that Morgan or Remy might design warning kids of the dangers of vandalism.

Family and Relationships -- Have students compare and contrast the reaction of Remy's parents and Morgan's parents to the news that their children took the stop sign. Were the reactions what you expected? How did the mothers' responses differ from the fathers' responses? In what way did this entire situation affect Remy's brother Mac? Why did it influence him so profoundly?

Guilt -- On page 95, Morgan refers to himself as "a slime." How does the omniscient point of view of the novel help you understand the inner struggles of the characters? How would the story be different if it were told in limited or first person point of view? What perspectives might be gained? Lost? In your view, are Morgan and Remy "slimes"?

Friendship -- What is the irony in Nickie Budie's name? In what way was he anything but a buddy to Morgan and Remy? Define a buddy. Were Morgan and Remy true buddies?

Interdisciplinary Connections

History
-- Morgan is the son of a politician. Ask students what the inherent difficulties and benefits might be of growing up in the public eye. Have them research people who were children or teenagers in the White House (Chelsea Clinton; Amy Carter; John F. Kennedy, Jr.; Caroline Kennedy; Julie Nixon Eisenhower; etc.) What are their perceptions of being the child of a public official? What are they doing now?

Invite a criminal lawyer to the class. Ask this person to speak about the similarities and differences between being tried as an adult and as a juvenile. What age limits are involved? Are there any instances in which minors can be tried as adults despite their age? What distinguishes a civil suit from a criminal suit? What are the differences between vandalism, criminal mischief, and malicious mischief? What are the maximum punishments for each of those crimes?

Language Arts -- Have students find a reward notice in the Classified Ads section of your local newspaper. Compare this notice to the one written by Mr. Thompson. Ask them to write an original story explaining the reasons for and the outcomes of their reward notice. Have students share their stories with the class.

Ask students to research their "dream car." Using reference materials like Consumer Reports, have them determine their dream car's price, average gas mileage, optional features available, safety record, etc. Allow students to design an advertisement for their dream cars using this information.

Math -- Have students look up statistics regarding traffic fatalities caused by young drivers in your county. Compare the statistics for males and females. Contrast your county's statistics with those of neighboring counties.

Vocabulary/Use of Language

Why did Remy's mother name her after the artist Rembrandt? In what way does this knowledge about the origin of her name cause her to feel guilty? Ask students if their names are "solid names of old" (page 7) or newer names. Provide a baby name book and have them look up the meaning of their names. What reasons do parents, grandparents, and friends give for the origins of students' first names? Ask students to write original definitions of their first names, using this knowledge. Have them illustrate their definitions and create a class name book.

Teaching Ideas prepared by Jane O. Wassynger, English Teacher, Greenville Middle School, Greenville, SC.

VOCABULARY

Why did Remy's mother name her after the artist Rembrandt? In what way does this knowledge about the origin of her name cause her to feel guilty? Ask students if their names are "solid names of old" (page 7) or newer names. Provide a baby name book and have them look up the meaning of their names. What reasons do parents, grandparents, and friends give for the origins of students' first names? Ask students to write original definitions of their first names, using this knowledge. Have them illustrate their definitions and create a class name book.

AWARDS

An ALA Best Book for Young Adults

An ALA Quick Pick

A Booklist Children's Editors' Choice

REVIEWS

* "A wrenching, breathlessly paced plot and an adrenaline-charged romance make Cooney's latest novel nearly impossible to put down. . . . This modern-day morality tale is as convincing as it is irresistible."--Starred, Publishers Weekly

* "A poignant, realistic novel, with nicely drawn characters and a vintage metaphor that's actually refreshing: A driver's license. . . . is the `ticket out of childhood."--Starred, Booklist

"Wonderfully written, and very realistic. Reluctant readers as usual will find this author tops."--VOYA


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