Random House: Bringing You the Best in Fiction, Nonfiction, and Children's Books
Authors
Books
Features
Newletters and Alerts

Buy now from Random House

  • The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book
  • Written by Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough
  • Format: Trade Paperback | ISBN: 9780804185325
  • Our Price: $25.00
  • Quantity:
See more online stores - The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book

Buy now from Random House

See more online stores - The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book

The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book

    Select a Format:
  • Book
  • eBook

500 Easy Recipes for Every Machine, Both Stovetop and Electric

Written by Bruce WeinsteinAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Bruce Weinstein and Mark ScarbroughAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Mark Scarbrough

eBook

List Price: $13.99

eBook

On Sale: February 17, 2015
Pages: 512 | ISBN: 978-0-8041-8533-2
Published by : Clarkson Potter Crown Illustrated
The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book Cover

Bookmark,
Share & Shelve:

  • Add This - The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book
  • Email this page - The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book
  • Print this page - The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book
ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
ABOUT THE AUTHOR ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Synopsis|Excerpt

Synopsis

The ultimate in pressure cooker books--with recipes for breakfasts, soups, mains, grains, vegetables, and desserts--each adapted for stovetop or electric models.

The old-fashioned pressure cooker has been rediscovered by modern home cooks, both for its quick-cooking powers (dried beans are perfectly soft in 35 minutes; risottos are tender in 20 minutes) and for its ability to infuse foods with intense flavor (carrots become sweeter, meat more savory). The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book has recipes for every device, stovetop and electric, no matter the manufacturer. Whether you're seeking an adventurous array of spices, found in dishes such as Cherry Chipotle Pulled Chicken or Smashed Sweet Potatoes with Pineapple and Ginger, or pure comfort food, like French Toast Bread Pudding or Classic Pot Roast and Potatoes, you'll find the perfect recipe--each labeled by level of ease--to feed your family. This is the only pressure cooker book you'll ever need.

Excerpt

chapter 1

Breakfast

Who digs a pressure cooker out of the cabinet on a busy Tuesday morning? Not ­us—­but we do get it out for a Saturday ­mid- morning breakfast or any time we have weekend guests in from New York City. Or on the holidays when we’ve got a house full of family. Or during busy photo shoots when we want a hot breakfast. Come to think of it: we’ve probably pulled out the pressure cooker on a Tuesday morning.

Using a pressure cooker for breakfast isn’t just about faster cooking; it’s also about better cooking. Toast is fast. A pressure cooker layers depths of flavor in breakfast casseroles and compotes, hashes, and even porridges, all without much effort.

Take ­steel-­cut oats. Yes, they’re done in minutes under pressure, as opposed to a long simmer in a saucepan. But they’re also done better: they not only take on the vaunted creaminess that ­long-­cooking affords but also pick up more flavor from the surrounding liquid and dried fruit.

Retaining a bit of firmness underneath the velvety luxury, they end up with better texture and a more intense flavor. They’re definitely more satisfying than any microwave fare.

You may also be surprised at how pressure cooks eggs: the whites stay creamy and delicate; the yolks, set to your preference. At this point, we can’t imagine making ­soft-­boiled eggs any other way.

Of course, there’s a “but” or two: pay attention to the stated release in these recipes and follow the instructions carefully. Some grains get foamy under pressure and will spurt out of the pressure valve if you attempt a quick release when a natural one is called for. Others need a bit of time under a natural release so they can absorb moisture and get tender without going gummy.

Most whole grains need to be presoaked. And be prepared to eat when breakfast is ready. Many of these dishes ­aren’t forgiving: bread puddings can get dry; eggs can turn tough. So make the coffee, set the table, and prepare the breakfast recipe as the last task in the list. Listen, ­that’s not a bad thing. If ever a meal called for efficiency, it’s breakfast. The day awaits!

One more thing: we’ve adjusted the Effort label in this first chapter. That is, recipes that might have been marked “a little” in a subsequent chapter are labeled “a lot” of effort here. Given that we stumble around half blind before our second cup of coffee, we sometimes think melting butter in the morning qualifies as heroic.

So here are some fine hot cereals, breakfast bread puddings, potato hashes, and fruit compotes. We’ve even got a fine and fast sausage gravy, a sweet breakfast version of polenta, and an innovative ­top-­of-­the-­morning risotto for a special treat. You provide the toast and coffee; the pressure cooker will do the rest.

Apple Maple Oatmeal

Effort: Not much • Pressure: High • Time under pressure: 12 or 18 minutes • Release: Natural • Serves: 4

1/2 cup ­steel-­cut oats

1/2 cup chopped dried apples

1/4 cup maple syrup

1/4 cup sliced almonds

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon salt

1Mix everything with 21/4 cups water in a ­6-­quart stovetop or electric pressure cooker.

2Lock the lid onto the pot.

STOVETOP: Set the pot over high heat and bring it to high pressure (15 psi). Once the pressure has been reached, reduce the heat as much as possible while keeping this pressure constant. Cook for

12 minutes.

OR

ELECTRIC: Set the machine to cook at high pressure (9–11 psi). Set the machine’s timer to cook at this pressure for 18 minutes.

3Reduce the pressure.

STOVETOP: Set the pot off the heat and let its pressure return to normal, about 10 minutes.

OR

ELECTRIC: Turn off the machine or unplug it so it ­doesn’t jump to its ­keep-­warm setting. Allow the pot’s pressure to return to normal, 10 to 12 minutes.

If the pressure in the pot ­hasn’t come back to normal within 12 minutes, use the ­quick-­release method to bring it back to normal.

4Unlock and open the pot; stir well before serving.

Testers’ Notes

This is a ­whole-­grain breakfast in minutes! It’s one of the perks of owning a pressure cooker.

Use only ­steel-­cut oats (also called “pinhead oats” or “Irish oats”), not rolled oats and not the more ground Scottish oats, and certainly not instant oats. ­Steel-­cut oats are the whole groats (bran, germ, and endosperm), cut into smaller pieces.

Don’t even think about using anything but real maple syrup in this recipe.

You can substitute chopped dried pears, nectarines, peaches, or apricots for the apples.

Serve It Up! Warm some milk, ­half-­and-­half, or cream in a small saucepan over low heat or in the microwave for a couple of minutes on high (but do not boil). Pour over each serving.

Creamy Banana Oatmeal

Effort: Not much • Pressure: High • Time under pressure: 12 or 18 minutes • Release: Natural • Serves: 4

1/2 cup ­steel-­cut oats

1/2 cup packed light brown sugar

2 ripe bananas, chopped

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup heavy cream

1Mix the oats, brown sugar, bananas, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt with 21/4 cups water in a ­6-­quart stovetop or electric pressure cooker until the brown sugar dissolves.

2Lock the lid onto the pot.

STOVETOP: Set the pot over high heat and bring it to high pressure (15 psi). Once this pressure

has been reached, reduce the heat as much as possible while maintaining this pressure. Cook for

12 minutes.

OR

ELECTRIC: Set the machine to cook at high pressure (9–11 psi). Set the machine’s timer to cook at high pressure for 18 minutes.

3Reduce the pressure.

STOVETOP: Set the pot off the heat and let its pressure fall to normal naturally, about 10 minutes.

OR

ELECTRIC: Turn off the machine or unplug it so it ­doesn’t flip to its ­keep-­warm setting. Allow the pot’s pressure to come to normal naturally, 10 to 12 minutes.

If the pot’s pressure ­hasn’t returned to normal within 12 minutes, use the ­quick-­release method to bring it back to normal.

4Unlock and open the cooker. Stir in the cream and set aside for 1 minute to warm before serving.

Testers’ Notes

Don’t double the amount of oats in any of these porridges: the grains are stocked with a sticky starch that will rise up and clog the pressure release valve. If you’ve got more than four persons for breakfast, make two batches.

For the best flavor, the bananas should be quite ripe, their skins mottled with plenty of brown spots. Look for the ones just about to be discounted: these are the best candidates.

You can substitute light cream, ­half-­and-­half, regular evaporated milk, or almond milk for the heavy cream.

Bulgur, Oat, and Walnut Porridge

Effort: A little • Pressure: High • Time under pressure: 16 or 24 minutes • Release: Quick • Serves: 6 to 8

1/2 cup ­steel-­cut oats

1/2 cup bulgur

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1/2 cup maple syrup

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon salt

1Mix everything with 4 cups water in a ­6-­quart stovetop or electric pressure cooker.

2Lock the lid onto the pot.

STOVETOP: Set the pot over high heat and bring it to high pressure (15 psi). Once this pressure has been reached, reduce the heat as much as possible while keeping the pressure constant. Cook for

16 minutes.

OR

ELECTRIC: Set the machine to cook at high pressure (9–11 psi). Set the machine’s timer to cook at high pressure for 24 minutes.

3Use the ­quick-­release method to bring the pot’s pressure back to normal.

4Unlock and remove the lid. Set the stovetop cooker over medium heat or turn the electric cooker to its browning function. Bring to a simmer, stirring often. Cook, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes.

Testers’ Notes

Because of the way bulgur absorbs water, there may be a little liquid left in the cereal after ­cooking—­a good thing, since it can scorch otherwise. So we advise simmering the cereal after cooking under pressure. That said, if you open the pot and find the porridge has a consistency to your liking, there’s no need for that extra work in step 4.

Bulgur is sold by ­grinds—­fine, ­medium-­coarse, and ­extra-­coarse. However, those grinds are often not labeled on the packaging except in certain brands sold at ­health-­food or gourmet stores. Any grind will work here, although fine (sometimes labeled “instant”) is probably the least successful, more like Cream of Wheat.

Maple syrup is sold by grades, with some packagers using letters and others using numbers: A or 1 is the lighter in flavor. Grade A or 1 is further broken down into light amber, medium amber, and dark amber. While many people like Grade A or 1 for pancakes, we prefer Grade B or 2 because of its more assertive flavor, including darkly herbaceous notes to pair against the other intense flavors.

Substitute chopped pecans or pistachios for the walnuts.

Serve It Up! Put a pat of butter and some freshly grated nutmeg on each serving.

Cheesy Grits

Effort: A lot • Pressure: High • Time under pressure: 12 or 18 minutes • Release: Modified natural • Serves: 4 to 6

1 cup corn grits (not instant)

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into very small bits

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup finely grated Cheddar cheese, preferably white (about 4 ounces)

Bottled hot red pepper sauce, such as Tabasco, to taste

1Set the pressure cooker rack inside a stovetop or electric cooker; pour in 2 cups water. Make an aluminum foil sling (see page 19) and set a ­2-­quart, ­high-­sided, round baking or soufflé dish on it. Mix the grits, butter, and salt with 21/2 cups water in the baking dish until smooth.

2Use the foil sling to lower the uncovered dish onto the rack in the cooker. (Do not cover the baking dish.) Fold the ends of the sling so they’ll fit inside the cooker.

3Lock the lid onto the pot.

STOVETOP: Set the pot over high heat and bring it to high pressure (15 psi). Once this pressure has been reached, reduce the heat as much as possible while keeping this pressure constant. Cook for

12 minutes.

OR

ELECTRIC: Set the machine to cook at high pressure (9–11 psi). Set the machine’s timer to cook at this pressure for 18 minutes.

4Turn off the heat and or unplug the machine. Set aside for 5 minutes, then use the ­quick-­release method to drop the pot’s pressure back to normal.

5Unlock and remove the lid. Lift the baking dish out of the cooker with its sling, steadying it as necessary to get it to a cutting board. Stir in the cheese and hot red pepper sauce; set aside for 1 minute to melt the cheese before serving.

Testers’ Notes

If you’ve never had cheese grits from a pressure cooker, you’re missing the creamiest cheese grits available. The intense cooking environment forces just the right amount of moisture into the bits of corn, and even without stirring, it’s perfect every time.

There’s no reason to use a ­run-­of-­the-­mill hot red pepper sauce here. Check out versions with smoky chipotles or even fiery habanero chiles.

Serve It Up! Spoon the grits onto a plate and top each serving with a fried egg; serve bacon on the side.

Apple, Ham, and Grits Casserole

Effort: A lot • Pressure: High • Time under pressure: 15 or 22 minutes • Release: Quick • Serves: 4 to 6

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more for buttering the dish

8 ounces Canadian bacon, chopped

1 medium tart green apple, such as Granny Smith, peeled, cored, and chopped

4 medium scallions, green and white parts, trimmed and sliced into thin bits

1 teaspoon dried thyme

3/4 cup ­quick-­cooking or instant grits

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese (about 2 ounces)

1Melt the butter in a ­6-­quart stovetop pressure cooker set over medium heat or in a ­6-­quart electric pressure cooker turned to the browning function. Add the Canadian bacon; cook, stirring often, for 1 minute. Add the apple, scallions, and thyme; cook for 1 more minute, stirring constantly. Scrape the contents of the cooker into a large bowl. Wipe out the cooker with a damp paper towel.

2Set the stovetop model back over medium heat or turn the electric one back to its browning or simmer mode. Add 3 cups water and bring to a boil. Whisk in the grits and cook, whisking all the while, until thickened, about 5 minutes. Scrape the grits into the bowl with the bacon mixture; cool for 10 minutes. Wash and dry the cooker.

3Set the pressure cooker rack inside the cooker and pour in 2 cups water. Make a foil sling (see page 19) and set a ­2-­quart, ­high-­sided, round baking or soufflé dish on top of it. Lightly butter the inside of the dish.

4Stir the eggs and cheese into the grits mixture until uniform and well combined. Spread the mixture in the prepared baking dish; cover and seal with foil. Lower the dish onto the rack in the cooker with the sling. Fold the ends of the sling so they’ll fit inside the cooker.

5Lock the lid onto the pot.

STOVETOP: Set the pot over high heat and bring it to high pressure (15 psi). Once this pressure has been reached, reduce the heat as much as possible while keeping this pressure constant. Cook for

15 minutes.

OR

ELECTRIC: Set the machine to cook at high pressure (9–11 psi). Set the machine’s timer to cook at this pressure for 22 minutes.

6Use the ­quick-­release method to bring the pot’s pressure back to normal.

7Unlock and open the cooker. Use the sling to transfer the baking dish to a wire cooling rack, steadying the dish as necessary. Uncover, cool a couple of minutes, and spoon the casserole onto individual plates to serve.

Testers’ Notes

Here’s the perfect brunch dish: a creamy, cheesy casserole with big flavors. You just need the mimosas.

Be careful: the cooker will be hot as you wipe it out between steps of this recipe.

You can make the recipe through step 3 up to 1 hour in advance.

Try substituting one ripe Bosc pear for the apple. You can also substitute Monterey jack or Swiss for the Cheddar.

Serve It Up! For breakfast, garnish with maple syrup. For lunch, offer a tossed green salad on the side. For dinner, pour a glass of Sauvignon Blanc.

Breakfast Polenta with Pine Nuts and Honey

Effort: Not much • Pressure: High • Time under pressure: 8 or 12 minutes • Release: Quick • Serves: 6
Bruce Weinstein

About Bruce Weinstein

Bruce Weinstein - The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book

Photo © Jon Fisher

Bruce Weinstein owns Foodworks, a food consulting and advertising business in New York City, where he also lives. He writes and develops recipes for Nabisco, House of Seagram, Bols Liqueurs, Tropicana, and other companies.

Your E-Mail Address
send me a copy

Recipient's E-Mail Address
(multiple addresses may be separated by commas)

A personal message: