Random House: Bringing You the Best in Fiction, Nonfiction, and Children's Books
Authors
Books
Features
Newletters and Alerts

Buy now from Random House

  • Cold War Laboratory
  • Written by Martin J. Collins
  • Format: Hardcover | ISBN: 9781588340863
  • Our Price: $39.95
  • Quantity:
See more online stores - Cold War Laboratory

Cold War Laboratory

RAND, the Air Force, and the American State, 1945-1950

Written by Martin J. CollinsAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Martin J. Collins

Cold War Laboratory Cover

Bookmark,
Share & Shelve:

  • Add This - Cold War Laboratory
  • Email this page - Cold War Laboratory
  • Print this page - Cold War Laboratory
ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
Synopsis

Synopsis

In 1946, before the start of the Cold War with the Soviet Union, the Army Air Forces established Project RAND -- a groundbreaking 'think tank' designed to link leaders in the military and aircraft industry. The new organization was a response to fears that long-range bombers, guided missiles, and atomic bombs inaugurated a new era of danger. Modern war was now total war, a contest between entire societies, and demanded the commitment of peacetime preparation.

Science and technology were crucial for such preparation, and RAND offered the Air Force a conduit to the expertise of industry and universities. As an institutional crossroads, RAND became a unique place to experiment with methods and ideas to prepare a pluralistic, democratic society for total war.

Martin J. Collins examines the critical years of this experiment through an evolving cast of key individuals: Hap Arnold and MIT professor Edward L. Bowles; Rowan Gaither, president of the RAND board of trustees; Frank Collbohm and Lawrence Henderson, director and associate director of RAND; and mathematician Edwin Paxson, the leader of RAND's first system analysis -- a RAND invention that sought to make a science of the study of war. Collins presents an in-depth examination of the birth of systems analysis and how it combined science, politics, and postwar concerns.

In developing systems analysis, RAND drew on a spectrum of science and engineering disciplines, and from the fields of economics, political science, and sociology. Its research symbolized the new and far-reaching effects of our response to the Cold War.

Your E-Mail Address
send me a copy

Recipient's E-Mail Address
(multiple addresses may be separated by commas)

A personal message: