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  • Notes from the Larder
  • Written by Nigel Slater
  • Format: Hardcover | ISBN: 9781607745433
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  • Notes from the Larder
  • Written by Nigel Slater
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Notes from the Larder

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A Kitchen Diary with Recipes

Written by Nigel SlaterAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Nigel Slater

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List Price: $19.99

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On Sale: September 24, 2013
Pages: 544 | ISBN: 978-1-60774-544-0
Published by : Ten Speed Press Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony
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ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
ABOUT THE AUTHOR ABOUT THE AUTHOR
PRAISE PRAISE
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Synopsis|Excerpt|Table of Contents

Synopsis

Following on the success of Tender and Ripe, this companion to the bestselling Kitchen Diaries is a beautiful, inspiring chronicle of a year in food from beloved food writer Nigel Slater. 
   
Britain’s foremost food writer returns with his quietly passionate, idiosyncratic musings on a year in the kitchen, alongside more than 250 simple and seasonal recipes. Based on Slater’s journal entries, Notes from the Larder is a collection of small kitchen celebrations, whether a casual supper of grilled lamb, or a quiet moment contemplating a bowl of cauliflower soup with toasted hazelnuts. Through this personal selection of recipes, Slater offers a glimpse into the daily inspiration behind his cooking and the pleasures of making food by hand, such as his thoughts on topics as various as the kitchen knife whose every nick and stain is familiar, how to make a little bit of cheese go a long way when the cupboards are bare, and his reluctance to share desserts.

Excerpt

A few words of introduction
I cook. I have done so pretty much every day of my life since I was a teenager. Nothing flashy, or showstopping, just straightforward, everyday stuff.

The kind of food you might like to come home to after a busy day. A few weekend recipes, some cakes and baking for fun, the odd pot of preserves or a feast for a celebration. But generally, just simple, understated food, something to be shared rather than looked at in wonder and awe.

Sharing recipes. It is what I do. A small thing, but something I have done for a while now. As a food writer, I find there is nothing so encouraging as the sight of one of my books, or one of my columns torn from the newspaper, that has quite clearly been used to cook from. A telltale splatter of olive oil, a swoosh of roasting juices, or a starburst of squashed berries on a page suddenly gives a point to what I do. Those splotches, along with kind emails, letters, and tweets, give me a reason to continue doing what I have been doing for the past quarter of a century. Sharing ideas, tips, stories, observations. Or, to put it another way, having a conversation with others who like to eat.

That is why, I suppose, each book feels like a chat with another cook, albeit one-sided (though not as one-sided as you might imagine). It is a simple premise. I make something to eat, and everyone, including myself, has a good time, so I decide to share the recipe. To pass on that idea, and with it, hopefully, a good time, to others. For twenty years I have shared many of those ideas each week in my column in the Observer and in my books. They might also come dressed up a little nowadays, in the form of the television series, but it is still the same basic premise.
 
 
Tomato and basil bruschetta 
olive oil: 6 tablespoons
basil: 1/2 cup (20g)
cherry tomatoes on the vine,
ripe and juicy: 4 sprigs
crusty white bread: 4 small slices
marinated artichoke hearts:
4 small
 
Preheat the broiler. Pour the oil into a blender. Tear up the basil and add it to the oil, then blend to a smooth green puree. Place the sprigs of tomatoes, still on the vine if you wish, on a baking sheet and broil till the skins just start to blacken and burst here and there. Place the slices of bread on the baking sheet and pour over the basil oil. Season with salt and black pepper, then place under the broiler for a couple of minutes, till the edges are crisp.

Place a sprig of cooked tomatoes on each and tuck in the artichokes, halved or sliced.

Serve immediately, while the toast is still hot and crisp.

Makes 4 small toasts

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments     

Introduction    

January    
February    
March    
April    
May    
June    
July    
August    
September    
October    
November    
December    

Index
Nigel Slater

About Nigel Slater

Nigel Slater - Notes from the Larder
Nigel Slater is the author of a collection of bestselling books, including the classics Real Fast FoodAppetite, and the critically acclaimed The Kitchen Diaries. He has written a much-loved column for The Observer for eighteen years and is the presenter of the award-winning BBC series Simple Suppers. His memoir, Toast --The Story of a Boy’s Hunger, has won six major awards, including British Biography of the Year, and has been adapted into a BBC film. Ripe is the companion volume to TenderA cook and his vegetable patch. Visit www.nigelslater.com.
Praise

Praise

“Few cooks describe flavors better, or with more charm.” 
—Wall Street Journal

“Not only is Nigel Slater one of the greatest living food writers, he’s also the ultimate urban gardener.” 
Bon Appétit

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