Random House: Bringing You the Best in Fiction, Nonfiction, and Children's Books
Authors
Books
Features
Newletters and Alerts

Buy now from Random House

  • The M1 Garand
  • Written by Leroy Thompson
    Illustrated by Peter Dennis
  • Format: Trade Paperback | ISBN: 9781849086219
  • Our Price: $17.95
  • Quantity:
See more online stores - The M1 Garand

Buy now from Random House

  • The M1 Garand
  • Written by Leroy Thompson
    Illustrated by Peter Dennis
  • Format: eBook | ISBN: 9781780964348
  • Our Price: $15.95
  • Quantity:
See more online stores - The M1 Garand

The M1 Garand

    Select a Format:
  • Book
  • eBook

Written by Leroy ThompsonAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Leroy Thompson
Illustrated by Peter DennisAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Peter Dennis

eBook

List Price: $15.95

eBook

On Sale: May 22, 2012
Pages: 80 | ISBN: 978-1-78096-434-8
Published by : Osprey Publishing Osprey Publishing
The M1 Garand Cover

Bookmark,
Share & Shelve:

  • Add This - The M1 Garand
  • Email this page - The M1 Garand
  • Print this page - The M1 Garand
ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
Synopsis

Synopsis

The M1 Garand gave US infantrymen a marked edge during World War II. It shot faster and further than enemy infantry rifles and hit harder. No less an authority on killing the enemy than General George S. Patton called the Garand, "The greatest battle implement ever devised." At a time when opposing forces were armed with bolt action rifles, US troops had a highly reliable self-loader. It was the US Army's principal infantry weapon in World War II, beloved of troops for its ability to withstand hard use and be ready when needed. In most battles the Garands speed of fire combined with the powerful .30-06 cartridge gave US troops a distinct advantage. The eight-round clips which were used to load the M1 Garand were, however, viewed with mixed emotions by the troops on the ground. Eight rounds was not much magazine capacity for a self-loading rifle, thus requiring frequent reloading in combat. Some Army and Marine Corps troops allegedly felt that the distinctive "twang" as the Garand's clip was ejected when empty alerted the enemy that the soldiers were reloading and resulted in an attack. But this problem may have been overstated as experienced troops did not all empty their weapons at the same time. It was also a particularly heavy weapon in contrast to the much lighter M1 Carbine. But the Garand became the defining mankiller of the war, despite its weight and magazine problems, and many US combat veterans consider it one of the key reasons they survived the war, as one veteran succinctly commented, "I let my Garand do the talking."

Your E-Mail Address
send me a copy

Recipient's E-Mail Address
(multiple addresses may be separated by commas)

A personal message: