Random House: Bringing You the Best in Fiction, Nonfiction, and Children's Books
Authors
Books
Features
Newletters and Alerts

Buy now from Random House

  • Living and Dying in Brick City
  • Written by Sampson Davis and Lisa Frazier Page
  • Format: Trade Paperback | ISBN: 9780812982343
  • Our Price: $16.00
  • Quantity:
See more online stores - Living and Dying in Brick City

Buy now from Random House

See more online stores - Living and Dying in Brick City

Buy now from Random House

See more online stores - Living and Dying in Brick City

Living and Dying in Brick City

    Select a Format:
  • Book
  • eBook

An E.R. Doctor Returns Home

Written by Sampson DavisAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Sampson Davis and Lisa Frazier PageAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Lisa Frazier Page

eBook

List Price: $11.99

eBook

On Sale: February 12, 2013
Pages: 256 | ISBN: 978-0-679-60518-8
Published by : Spiegel & Grau Random House Group
Living and Dying in Brick City Cover

Bookmark,
Share & Shelve:

  • Add This - Living and Dying in Brick City
  • Email this page - Living and Dying in Brick City
  • Print this page - Living and Dying in Brick City
ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
ABOUT THE AUTHOR ABOUT THE AUTHOR
PRAISE PRAISE
READER'S GUIDE READER'S GUIDE
Synopsis

Synopsis

A riveting personal exploration of the healthcare crisis facing inner-city communities, written by an emergency room physician who grew up in the very neighborhood he is now serving
 
Sampson Davis is best known as one of three friends from inner-city Newark who made a pact in high school to become doctors. Their book The Pact and their work through the Three Doctors Foundation have inspired countless young men and women to strive for goals they otherwise would not have dreamed they could attain. In this book, Dr. Davis looks at the healthcare crisis in the inner city from a rare perspective: as a doctor who works on the front line of emergency medical care in the community where he grew up, and as a member of that community who has faced the same challenges as the people he treats every day. He also offers invaluable practical advice for those living in such communities, where conditions like asthma, heart disease, stroke, obesity, and AIDS are disproportionately endemic.
 
Dr. Davis’s sister, a drug addict, died of AIDS; his brother is now paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair as a result of a bar fight; and he himself did time in juvenile detention—a wake-up call that changed his life. He recounts recognizing a young man who is brought to the E.R. with critical gunshot wounds as someone who was arrested with him when he was a teenager during a robbery gone bad; describes a patient whose case of sickle-cell anemia rouses an ethical dilemma; and explains the difficulty he has convincing his landlord and friend, an older woman, to go to the hospital for much-needed treatment. With empathy and hard-earned wisdom, Living and Dying in Brick City presents an urgent picture of medical care in our cities. It is an important resource guide for anyone at risk, anyone close to those at risk, and anyone who cares about the fate of our cities.
 
Praise for Living and Dying in Brick City
 
“A pull-no-punches look at health care from a seldom-heard sector . . . Living and Dying isn’t a sky-is-falling chronicle. It’s a real, gutsy view of a city hospital.”Essence
 
“Gripping . . . a prescription to help kids dream bigger than their circumstances, from someone who really knows.”People
 
“[Dr. Davis] is really a local hero. His story has inspired so many of our young people, and he’s got his finger on the pulse of what is a challenge in Newark, and frankly all across America. . . . I think his book is going to make a big impact.”—Cory Booker

“Some memoirs are heartfelt, some are informative and some are even important. Few, however, are all three. . . . As rare as it is for a book to be heartfelt, well written and inspirational, it’s even rarer for a critic to say that a book should be required reading. This ought to be included in high school curricula—for the kids in the suburbs who have no idea what life is like in the inner cities, and for the kids in the inner cities to know that there is a way out.”—The Star-Ledger
 
“Dramatic and powerful.”—New York Daily News

“This book just might save your life. Sampson Davis shares fascinating stories from the E.R. and addresses the inner-city health crisis. His book is an important investment in your most valuable resource: your health.”—Suze Orman, author of The Money Class

Lisa Frazier Page

About Lisa Frazier Page

Lisa Frazier Page - Living and Dying in Brick City
Lisa Frazier Page, an editor and award-winning reporter at The Washington Post, is the co-author of the New York Times bestseller The Pact: Three Young Men Make a Promise and Fulfill a Dream. A graduate of New Orleans’s Dillard University, Page holds a master’s degree from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. She grew up in Bogalusa, Louisiana, and lives in the Washington, D.C., area with her husband. They have four children.
Praise

Praise

“A pull-no-punches look at health care from a seldom-heard sector . . . Living and Dying isn’t a sky-is-falling chronicle. It’s a real, gutsy view of a city hospital.”Essence
 
“Gripping . . . a prescription to help kids dream bigger than their circumstances, from someone who really knows.”People
 
“[Dr. Davis] is really a local hero. His story has inspired so many of our young people, and he’s got his finger on the pulse of what is a challenge in Newark, and frankly all across America. . . . I think his book is going to make a big impact.”—Cory Booker

“Some memoirs are heartfelt, some are informative and some are even important. Few, however, are all three. . . . As rare as it is for a book to be heartfelt, well written and inspirational, it’s even rarer for a critic to say that a book should be required reading. This ought to be included in high school curricula—for the kids in the suburbs who have no idea what life is like in the inner cities, and for the kids in the inner cities to know that there is a way out.”—The Star-Ledger
 
“Dramatic and powerful.”—New York Daily News

“This is one of the best books I have read in a long time. Sampson Davis’s personal story is powerful, and his experiences in the ER room underscore the lack of effective health care in our underserved communities. Newark is lucky to have him as a citizen, and we are all lucky that he has shared his insights and expertise with us in Living and Dying in Brick City. His is an important voice in the conversation on health care in this country.”—Wes Moore, author of The Other Wes Moore
 
“This book just might save your life. Sampson Davis shares fascinating stories from the E.R. and addresses the inner-city health crisis. His book is an important investment in your most valuable resource: your health.”—Suze Orman, author of The Money Class
 
“This book is living proof that behind the boarded-up windows of one of America’s most neglected cities, beyond the sorrow and the pain, there is much more than we’ve come to expect. There is hope. There is change. There is redemption for Brick City. The book will open your eyes to a part of the world that most of us only see from behind the wheel of a tightly locked car. Sampson Davis is not afraid to lift heavy objects in this world. I’m glad he shared his journey with us, so that we know it is possible.”—James McBride, author of The Color of Water

Living and Dying in Brick City provides a fascinating look at the interesting but often terrifying life of a medical professional in a tough inner-city hospital. More importantly it provides excellent and very practical advice about healthcare issues that are relevant to people of every socioeconomic group. It is entertaining while being helpful.” —Benjamin S. Carson Sr., MD, The Benjamin S Carson Sr MD and Dr Evelyn Spiro RN Professor and Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions


From the Hardcover edition.
Teachers Guide

Teacher's Guide



NOTE TO TEACHERS

Please click on the PDF link at the bottom of this page to download the free Teacher's Guide. Email us at highschool@randomhouse.com for a printed copy.


The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) place emphasis on the importance of reading and examining nonfiction for meaning and application to society. For this reason, Living and Dying in Brick City is particularly appropriate for use in language arts and the social sciences. The discussion and activities in this guide are aligned with CCSS and offer an opportunity for discussion, analysis, and debate of the health crisis in urban America and as it relates to the population of the inner-city community.

For a complete listing of the Standards, go to www.corestandards.org/the-standards.

In addition, Dr. Davis’s Living and Dying in Brick City not only explores the real world experiences inside the E.R., but also offers teenagers and adults preventative guidance to support initiatives for healthier lives and communities.



PRE-READING ACTIVITY
 
Critical Thinking Activity:
Click and read the article “Woman Featured in Stark Anti-Smoking Ads Dies” (Tween
Tribune) http://tweentribune.com/teen/woman-featured-stark-anti-smoking-ads-dies
 
Critical Thinking Challenge:
Why was Terri’s ad so effective? Click and read the New York Times article “The E-Cigarette Industry, Waiting to Exhale.” (A version of this article appears in print on October 27, 2013, on page BU1 of the New York edition with the headline “Waiting to Exhale.”) http://www. nytimes.com/2013/10/27/business/the-e-cigarette-industry-waiting-to-exhale.html?_r=0

Critical Thinking Challenge:
The F.D.A. has said it plans to issue preliminary rules for public comment on e-cigarette regulations. What is your opinion as to the impact of e-cigarettes? Is there enough supporting evidence to substantiate the claims made in this article? Consider other sources of research you may use to support your opinion.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.5; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.6; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.1.

Compare and Contrast:
After reading both articles and viewing Terri’s video, become the voice of Terri Hall. Challenge yourself to write a script/or produce a video on the effects of e-cigarettes that identifies with Terri Hall.

CSSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.4; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.5; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.6; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.7; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.9.
 


CLASSROOM DISCUSSION

1. Living and Dying in Brick City is a work of nonfiction. Sampson Davis chose “real life drama to shine a light on the health crisis in America’s city and to show the potential consequences regarding personal health.” One of the goals of any type of research is to deepen an understanding of the issue. As a primary source, how does Sampson Davis set out to accomplish this goal? In your opinion, was he successful?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1d.
 
2. Dr. Davis and Dr. Marc Borenstein, chairman of Beth Israel’s Emergency Department often shared their experiences of growing up. Dr. Davis stated, “Struggle can leave a lifelong imprint on a person’s soul, and it often breeds compassion.” Based on your personal experiences, what struggle in your life has led you to a greater understanding of the meaning of compassion?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1c.
 
3. Discuss and cite from the text the struggles that Sampson Davis experienced.
How did these struggles affect his life?
 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.3.
 
4. On his first day on duty in the E.R.’s trauma unit, Dr. Davis recognizes the name Don Moses (a.k.a. “Snake”) on the board with the names of the deceased. Compare and contrast the two men’s lives. What was the critical element in Dr. Davis’s early life that changed him? And how did it change him? In your discussion, cite supporting evidence and key elements that led to the change.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1d; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.2.
  
5. “Kids aren’t born without hope.” What do you think Sampson Davis meant by this statement? Cite evidence from the text to support your response.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2.
 
6. On page 23, the text reads “Children growing up in poor urban neighborhoods aren’t programed by their DNA to run around with guns, killing one another. Violence is a learned behavior. . . .” What is your reaction to this statement?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.1b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.4; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.1b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.4.
 
7. On page 41, Dr. Davis asks, “Do we do more harm than good?” Who is the “we” Dr. Davis is referring to? What is he referencing with this statement?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.1b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.4; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.1b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.4.
 
8. In Chapter 4, “Love Hurts,” Dr. Davis writes about his family. Discuss some of the key elements in this chapter that influenced Dr. Davis’s life. Talk about the values that are important in your family. Discuss the value of family in the American culture.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4.
 
9. Chapter 5, “Dying for Love,” discusses sexually transmitted infections. Why did Dr. Davis feel compelled to include this topic in his book? How does this chapter impact the decisions in your life?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.6.
 
10. Read the Tween Tribune article, “Teen Moms Clueless About How They Got Pregnant,” below. What common threads do you see between the article and Chapter 6, “Baby Love”? http://tweentribune.com/teen/many-teenage-girls-clueless-about-getting-pregnant

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.3.
 
11. “Tempers, fueled by alcohol, explode over the smallest perceived insult—a wrong look, a stepped on shoe, rejection from a beautiful woman—suddenly throwing everything into chaos. Add guns to the mix, and many times someone winds up dead.” (Chapter 7, “Clubbing”) React to these statements, citing either personal experiences or information from other sources.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.1c.
 
12.  In Chapter 8, “Fear Factor,” Dr. Davis writes about cancer, smoking, and death. Share your knowledge and experiences on any of these topics. Which of these experiences (if any) has impacted your life?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4.
 
13.  Have you ever participated in any health awareness activities, such as the Relay for Life, Wear Pink, or Bandanas for Breast Cancer events? Share your experience. Did it change you in any way?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4.

14.  After reading pages 170 and 171, “The Warning Signs for Suicide,” discuss what interventions you could use when faced with a friend who is depressed.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.3; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4.
 
15.  Read the article “Teens & Tweens ‘Don’t Know’ About Exercise.” Respond to the question at the end of the article, “What do you think?” http://tweentribune.com/teen/teens-tweens-dont-know-about-exercise

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1d.
 
16.  In Chapter 13, “Reaching Out,” how does Monique remind Dr. Davis of himself? Cite supporting evidence.
 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.3.
 
17.  Watch the YouTube video “Who Moved My Cheese?” After viewing the video, compare its message with Dr. Davis’s “unexpected twists” in Chapter 14. Make sure that you have supporting evidence. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDNhEYpBPbY

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.3; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.3.
 


ACTIVITIES
 
1. In Chapter 2, “Hidden in Plain Sight,” Dr. Davis references sickle cell anemia and the plague of drug abuse. Choose a current healthcare topic that you can relate to. Write a persuasive essay on the topic, expressing your own ideas clearly and persuasively.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.5; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.6.
 
2. Sudden cardiac arrest, smoking, diabetes, AIDS, STDs, birth control, cancer, obesity, and depression are all topics of discussion in Living and Dying in Brick City. Choose one topic to research. Use your research to create an informational pamphlet for a targeted audience.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.6.
 
3. In Chapter 2, “Hidden in Plain Sight” Dr. Davis states, “Prescription drug abuse is the fastest growing drug problem in the United States.” (Page 40) Go to the website Above the Influence (http://www.abovetheinfluence.com). Choose one of the following formats (PowerPoint, video, or poster) to create an advertisement for Red Ribbon Week.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.6; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.8.
 
4. Dr. Davis struggled with the question, “Did we do more harm than good? We were supposed to help our patients, or at least do no harm. That’s what all doctors promise when we take the Hippocratic Oath.” Form teams and debate whether doctors help
or harm patients. The book and the website The Hippocratic Oath Today (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/body/hippocratic-oath-today.html)  can be used as resources.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1d.
 
5. Create a brochure to inform your community of available healthcare resources. Be sure to include information such as dental care, local clinics, hospitals, schools, community center program, etc. Be sure to consider that you address the various needs of your population.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.7; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.8; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.9-10.9.
  
6. Prepare a PowerPoint presentation or graph to illustrate and analyze the data related to one of the following topics: dating violence, domestic violence, or gang violence.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.7; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.8; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.9; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.6.
 
7. Dr. Davis compared his Honda Accord, “The Coupe,” to himself. Explain his analogy in a reflective narrative.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.3; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.3a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.3b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.3c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.3d; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.3e.
 
8. Dr. Davis referred to the 1932 Tuskegee Institute experiment, “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male.” Research this topic and be prepared to present your findings. Be sure to reference the following people in your research and their link to the topic: Bill Clinton, Clark and Vondelehr, Dr. Dibble and Nurse Rivers, and Peter Buxtun.
 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2a; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2b; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2d; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2e.
 
9. “Education is the most permanent way off the streets,” says Dr. Davis. Create a jingle, musical number, rap, poem, illustration, cartoon, or video to showcase this quote.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.4; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.5; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.6.
 
10. Research the Three Doctors Foundation at http://www.threedoctorsfoundation.org. Dr. Davis dedicated his book to his mother who taught him that “the most important ingredient in medicine is compassion.” As a class, plan a schoolwide or classroom event that would focus on creating compassion among all members of your school community.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.7; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.8; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.5.
 
 

OTHER WORKS OF INTEREST
 
Results May Vary: A Novel About an Urban High School by Michael H. Haussler
 
Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, a Man Who Would Cure the World
by Tracy Kidder
 
Dear Marcus: A Letter to the Man Who Shot Me by Jerry McGill
 
The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore
 
A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League
by Ron Suskind
 

 
ABOUT THIS GUIDE'S WRITERS
 
As educators, PATTY DeGEORGE,  KATHY DiPROFIO,  and NANCY SIRACUSA formed a pact while in graduate school. They vowed that through “determination, discipline and dedication,” they would earn their master’s degree in Educational Leadership and make a positive impact in education. Today, these three educators remain fast friends and continue to support each other in their respective roles as educational leaders in their school districts.
 
 

Download a PDF of the Teacher's Guide

Your E-Mail Address
send me a copy

Recipient's E-Mail Address
(multiple addresses may be separated by commas)

A personal message: