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  • The Drowned Vault (Ashtown Burials #2)
  • Written by N. D. Wilson
  • Format: Trade Paperback | ISBN: 9780375863974
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  • The Drowned Vault (Ashtown Burials #2)
  • Written by N. D. Wilson
  • Format: eBook | ISBN: 9780375895739
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The Drowned Vault

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On Sale: September 11, 2012
Pages: 464 | ISBN: 978-0-375-89573-9
Published by : Random House Books for Young Readers RH Childrens Books

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On Sale: September 11, 2012
ISBN: 978-0-449-01442-4
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On Sale: September 11, 2012
ISBN: 978-0-449-01443-1
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ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
ABOUT THE AUTHOR ABOUT THE AUTHOR
PRAISE PRAISE
Synopsis

Synopsis

Fans of both Percy Jackson and Indiana Jones will be captivated by the lost civilizations, ancient secrets, and buried treasure found in the second book of the Ashtown Burials series, action-packed adventure by N. D. Wilson, the author of Leepike Ridge and the 100 Cupboards trilogy.

It's been almost a year since Cyrus and Antigone Smith earned their places as Journeymen at Ashtown, home of an ancient order of explorers that has long guarded the world's secrets and treasures. While their studies go well, Cy and Tigs are not well liked since losing the Dragon's Tooth to the nefarious Dr. Phoenix. The Tooth is the only object in the world capable of killing the long-lived transmortals, and Phoenix has been tracking them down one-by-one, and murdering them.

The surviving transmortals, led by legendary warrior Gilgamesh of Uruk, descend on Ashtown in force, demanding justice. Cy and Tigs find themselves on the run in a desperate search to locate Phoenix and regain the Tooth. In the process, they uncover an evil even more dangerous than Phoenix, one that has been waiting for centuries to emerge.
N. D. Wilson

About N. D. Wilson

N. D. Wilson - The Drowned Vault
Stories have always been in my life. I honestly can’t remember a time when I wasn’t listening to a story or being read to. When I was two, my father read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings to the family after dinner (the family at that point consisted of my mother, my older sister, and myself). My mother was fairly certain that I didn’t understand any of it. My father, however, pointed to scientific evidence: during the battle scenes, I always turned bright red and began sweating nervously in my high chair.
Once, while I was misbehaving in my bath (it only happened once), my older sister was commissioned to tell me a story. She began to recite the beginning of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe verbatim. Which should tell you how often we’d heard it.
At nights, my mother would compose stories for me (stories that she falsely insists were awful–mostly about a gentleman named Tiny Tim). I don’t remember any particular tale, but I do remember what they did to me, as I lay in bed, clutching Billy, my stuffed, hybrid monkey-bear, staring at the sloped ceiling in my room and listening to my mother’s voice and the washing machine chugging in the corner (yes, the washing machine was in my room). My father once wrote me a story, bound it in a blue folder, and read it to me. The story starred a young fellow who happened to share my name (Nathan), and who also happened to kill a goblin king with his baseball bat (something I still intend to do). I am extremely fond of that story, and I pay tribute to it with elements in both Leepike Ridge and 100 Cupboards (a character trapped underground, the handiness of baseball bats, a grub-eating wizard, and a couple other things that only my father and I will know about).
My grandfathers were both storytellers. Both were military men, and both lived through some truly strange experiences. Growing up in San Louis Obispo, my mom’s dad hunted small sharks with a modified garden hoe somewhere around the ripe old age of ten. He flew bombers in World War II and Korea, and I’ve watched old home movies of some of his bombing runs. I’ve also watched home movies of him sneaking onto the roof of the Vatican with his then eight-year-old son (my uncle Bob). To this day, when I’m with him, he can surprise me with new stories.
As for my dad’s dad, well, he was raised on a Nebraska farm. His parents (and, I believe, his older brother) had moved there in a covered wagon. But it was a posh covered wagon–rolling on cutting-edge rubber tires.
For as long as I remember, my grandfather has been traveling, returning, and telling stories. At a very early age, I announced to my parents that when I grew up, I was going to be like Grandpa and tell everyone about my trip. The only problem is that my trips haven’t been as interesting.
There’s a reason why I dedicated 100 Cupboards to my grandfathers. They both infused my (fantasy-drifting) imagination with a taste for real-world adventure. 100 Cupboards is what happens when those things are thoroughly blended together (along with milk and sugar).
I live in Idaho, and I love the west, the rolling hills and vast, empty places. I grew up here, playing in those fields, floating in creeks, climbing in old barn lofts, and sledding (contrary to wisdom and the instruction of my elders) across frozen ponds. After graduate school in Maryland, I moved back. I currently live one block from the hospital where I was born, the hospital where all my kids have been born (one even in the same room).
I should tell you about my wife. I first heard her name spoken (Heather Garaway) while visiting home during grad school. My brother-in-law had briefly met her (and a number of other people) while visiting Santa Cruz, California. When he said her name it had a rather strange effect on me. It didn’t make me starry-eyed or mushy-stomached. It made me nervous, like I needed to look over my shoulder because I was about to be hit by a bus. My life was going to change.
I like to think of myself as rational. But while a friend drove me back to the airport, I took him as a witness to my strange sensation. That was at the beginning of October. Back in Maryland, I had an e-mail waiting for me from her. A friend of hers was attending the same school I was and he needed a place to live. On Halloween, I met her (she was traveling to Ireland and had a layover in Maryland). Just after Thanksgiving, I asked her to marry me. She was a globe-trotting surfer (and had just surfed her first pro contest when we met). And she said yes because she loved stories (and apparently me), and she knew what all her favorite characters in books would have done. She moved inland for me, but the saltwater is still in her veins. We have four beautiful children and she will teach them all to surf.
Her hair smells like rain, and it clings to my face like Velcro when I kiss her.
I love stories. I love finding them. I love telling them. I’m doing my best to live them. I couldn’t be more grateful for the life I’ve been given.
Praise

Praise

School Library Journal, October 2012:
"This action-packed sequel to The Dragon's Tooth (Random, 2011) promises--­and delivers­--as much magic, mystery, and mythology as its predecessor. Thanks to Cyrus and Antigone Smith, Dr. Phoenix now possesses the Dragon's Tooth--­and he's been using it to hunt and kill immortals worldwide. Phoenix has a dark agenda, but an evil alliance of immortals, Ordo Draconis, also seeks the tooth's power. Worse, the Ordos have a centuries-old vendetta against the Smith family. Circumstances within the Order of Brendan are already shaky when fearful immortals, led by Gilgamesh of Uruk, storm Ashtown, demanding Smith blood. The siblings narrowly escape. To help retrieve the tooth, they recruit the infamous immortal, Captain John Smith. Cyrus has a plan, but will it work? Characters are well drawn, and the story's many interwoven plotlines, although complex, are easy to follow. This absorbing guy-friendly adventure will appeal to fans of Michael Scott and Rick Riordan.­"

Booklist, September 15, 2012:
"Cyrus and Antigone Smith have a lot of problems. Their mother is still unresponsive in the hospital. The Ordo Draconis was stopped the last time out by their ancestor, Captain John Smith, but the cabal seems intent on rising to power again. The siblings should be training to become explorers, but there isn’t enough time. The leadership of the Order of Brendan is changing, and the transmortals--like Gilgamesh of Uruk--want revenge on Cyrus because he inadvertently put the Tooth of the Dragon into the hands of Dr. Phoenix. It’s no wonder the Smiths are on the run with the other Polygoners. They must fight their way through physical and emotional torture as they seek to release Captain Smith and stop Phoenix. Beginning where The Dragon’s Tooth (2011) left off, Wilson’s second installment is fast-paced and creatively plotted. New characters, such as Arache and her spiders and a mysterious red-winged blackbird, add complexity in relationships and prevent the story line from feeling contrived. In exploring the idea of what
it means to be truly alive, this novel will take your breath away."


From the Hardcover edition.

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