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  • Marvin Redpost #5: Class President
  • Written by Louis Sachar
    Illustrated by Adam Record
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  • Marvin Redpost #5: Class President
  • Written by Louis Sachar
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  • Marvin Redpost #5: Class President
  • Written by Louis Sachar
    Illustrated by Adam Record
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Written by Louis SacharAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Louis Sachar
Illustrated by Adam RecordAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Adam Record

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On Sale: September 28, 2011
Pages: 80 | ISBN: 978-0-307-80572-0
Published by : Random House Books for Young Readers RH Childrens Books
Marvin Redpost #5: Class President Cover

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ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
ABOUT THE AUTHOR ABOUT THE AUTHOR
PRAISE PRAISE
Synopsis|Excerpt

Synopsis

It's no ordinary Thursday for Marvin Redpost and his class...

It's "hole day," and even Mrs. North and Principal McCabe are wearing their very worst clothes. It seemed like a fun idea that morning, but now they're expecting company. The president -- of the United States! -- is on his way. And there's no time to change! Marvin must do math on the blackboard with television cameras pointed at him. And the day is just beginning!

Excerpt

Chapter 1

There was a red post out in front of Marvin Redpost's house. The rest of the fence was white. Marvin tapped the post for luck as he walked through the gate on his way to school.

He wore a pair of blue jeans with a hole over each knee. It was "hole day" at school.

Every day had been special this week. Monday, he had to wear socks that didn't match. Tuesday, everyone wore T-shirts that came from a vacation. Wednesday, yesterday, had been hat day. And today, everyone had to wear clothes with holes.

His two best friends, Nick and Stuart, were waiting for him at the corner.

"Do you think Mrs. North will wear clothes with holes?" asked Stuart.

"Sure, why not?" asked Marvin.

"No way!" said Nick. "I'll bet you a million dollars!"

Nick had also said there was "no way!" Mrs. North would wear mis-matched socks. He had also said there was "no way!" she would let the kids wear hats in class.

So far, he owed Marvin two million dollars.

Nick was wearing a T-shirt that had a large hole under his right armpit. It had been torn in a fight.

"She probably doesn't even own any clothes with holes," Nick said. "How could a teacher get holes in her clothes?"

"Moths," said Marvin. "She might have a wool sweater. Moths eat wool."

"Actually, moths don't really eat wool," Stuart pointed out. "Everybody thinks that, but really, it's the caterpillars that eat the wool."

Stuart was wearing a T-shirt that also had a large hole under the right armpit. It had been torn in a fight.

It was the same fight.

Nick and Stuart had fought each other. But now they were friends.

"You want to come over after school today?" Nick asked.

"Okay," said Stuart.

"I can't," said Marvin. "My mom is taking me to the shoe store. I'm going to my cousin's bar mitzvah on Saturday."

When they got to school, everybody they saw had holes in their clothes. Travis wore a shirt that was more hole than it was shirt. Clarence had a hole in his sneaker and his sock, so his big toe stuck all the way through.

"You should clip your toenail," said Marvin.

"You should clip your mouth!" said Clarence.

That didn't really make sense, but Marvin got the point. Clarence was the toughest kid in his class.

The bell rang, and everybody lined up and went to class.

Mrs. North was waiting in the classroom. She had a large hole in her shirt, over her stomach.
Marvin stopped and stared. He could see Mrs. North's belly button.

Nick now owed him three million dollars.


Chapter 2

Casey Happleton sat at the desk next to Marvin. She was absent today.

Marvin was disappointed to see her desk empty. She was a funny girl, and he knew she would have liked "hole day."

"I must say," said Mrs. North, "you are all so well dressed today. I've never seen a better-looking group of third graders."

Everybody laughed.

"How'd you get a hole in your shirt?" Kenny asked.

"I was working in my garden," said Mrs. North. "My shirt got snagged on a thorn from a rosebush."
Marvin nodded. He should have guessed.

"We should dress this way all the time," said Judy Jasper. "That way, nobody would feel bad if their parents were too poor to buy them new clothes."

"That's a good idea," said Mrs. North.

Marvin thought so, too.

"And the holes keep you cool on a hot day," Stuart pointed out.

"You're right," said Mrs. North.

Marvin agreed. Holes made perfect sense. He wondered why nobody had thought of it before.

A child's voice came over the P.A. system. "Please rise for the Pledge of Allegiance."

Every day, a different kid got to lead the school in the pledge.

"That's Casey!" said Judy Jasper.

Marvin recognized Casey's voice as she recited the pledge. She sounded very serious.

He put his hand over his heart and said it along with her.

When Casey came back to class, she told Mrs. North that Mr. McCabe wanted to see her. Mr. McCabe was the principal.

"Did he say why?" Mrs. North asked.

Casey shook her head.

Casey wore a shirt that was way too big for her. Marvin guessed it was her father's. Not only did it have holes in it, but it also had paint spilled on it.

Mrs. North told the class she would be gone for only a minute. She said she expected everyone to behave and to use their time wisely.

After she left, Nick said, "I bet you Mrs. North got in trouble for wearing torn clothes!"

"No, Mr. McCabe is also wearing torn clothes," said Casey. "I saw his elbow."

"What did it look like?" asked Judy.

"Pink and bumpy," said Casey.

Casey had a ponytail that stuck out of the side of her head instead of the back. She sat down next to Marvin. The ponytail was on Marvin's side. Sometimes, when Casey laughed really hard, her ponytail went around in circles.

Mrs. North was gone for a lot longer than a minute. When she returned, she had a very strange expression on her face. She looked lost. She opened her mouth, but didn't say anything.

"Are you all right?" asked Kenny.

Mrs. North looked at Kenny, but still didn't say anything. Finally, she spoke. She said, "We are..." then stopped.

She started again. "There will..."

That was as far as she got.

She tried again. "I expect..."

Her mouth shut tight. She tapped her desk with her fist.

At last she managed to say a complete sentence. "We are going to have a visitor today."

Marvin couldn't wait to hear who it was. From the way Mrs. North was acting, he thought it must be somebody weird.

"Who is it?" asked Warren.

"Is it somebody I've heard of?" asked Nick.

"Oh, I hope so, Nick," said Mrs. North. Then she took a deep breath and said, "The president will be coming here."

Everybody gasped.

Marvin was a little confused. He wasn't sure which president Mr. North meant. Did she mean the president of the United States? Or did she mean the president of something else, like the president of a shoe company?

Marvin's school was in Maryland. It was less than twenty miles from Washington, D.C. His father worked in Washington, D.C. So it was possible that Mrs. North meant the president of the United States. But why would the president of the United States come to his school?

He raised his hand.

Pasty Gatsby raised her hand, too.

"Yes, Patsy," said Mrs. North.

"The president of what?" Patsy asked.

Mrs. North stared at her as if she thought Patsy was an alien from another planet. "The president of the United States," she said.

"Duh!" said Travis.

Patsy blushed.

"Sometimes I wonder about you, Patsy," said Mrs. North.

"What'd you think? The president of Mexico?" asked Clarence.

Marvin turned red, too, but nobody noticed. He lowered his hand.

"Yes, Marvin, did you have a question?" asked Mrs. North.

He shook his head. "No, I was just stretching."

Mrs. North explained that even Mr. McCabe hadn't known the president was coming until ten minutes ago. It had been kept secret for security reasons.

"Now, I know I don't have to tell you how to behave when the president gets here," she said.
Then she told everybody how to behave.

"Be respectful. Be attentive. If you get a chance to speak to him, remember to speak loud and clear. You should call him 'Mr. President.' 'Yes, Mr. President.' 'Thank you, Mr. President.' Remember to -- "

Mrs. North suddenly stopped talking. "Oh, my gosh!" she exclaimed. "I have to change my clothes!"
Louis Sachar

About Louis Sachar

Louis Sachar - Marvin Redpost #5: Class President

Photo © Perry Hagopian

Newbery Award–winning author Louis Sachar is the creator of the entertaining Marvin Redpost books as well as the much-loved There’s a Boy in the Girls’ Bathroom, winner of 17 child-voted state awards.

Louis Sachar’s book Holes, winner of the 1999 Newbery Medal, the National Book Award, and the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award, is also an ALA Best Book for Young Adults, an ALA Quick Pick, an ALA Notable Book, and was made into a major motion picture.

A Few Words From Louis Sachar
Of all the characters from Holes, why did you choose to revisit Armpit in SMALL STEPS?
LS: I tend to write about underdogs. It seemed to me that life would be tough for an African-American teenager from a low-income family with a criminal record. Especially someone stuck with the name, "Armpit."
Although this new book is about a character from Holes, the two books are very different. How would you explain to a fan of Holes what to expect from SMALL STEPS?
LS: I can't. I'm no good at describing my books. Holes has been out now for seven years, and I still can't come up with a good answer when asked what that book is about.
Could you imagine future novels about any of the other boys?
Do you think about what Stanley is up to now?
LS: I don't think too much about Stanley or Zero. I left them in a good place. Although money doesn't bring happiness, or give meaning to someone's life, the problems Stanley and Zero face now (and I'm sure they do face many problems) are less interesting than those faced by someone like Armpit.
Plenty of teenagers fantasize about what it would be like to be a young rock star.
You portray it as lonely. Tell us about that decision.
LS: The media tends to portray the teenage world as one where drinking and sex is taken for granted. In fact, I think most teenagers don't drink, are unsure of themselves, and feel awkward around members of the opposite sex. I thought it was important to show Kaira, a rock star no less, as such a person. Her situation, in many ways, is made more difficult as she has no social contact with anyone her age. She is trapped in a world of agents, record producers, and hanger-ons.
I'm imagining that off all the books you've written, Holes is the one that has changed your life the most. Not only did it win the Newbery Medal, it's also simply a popular sensation. Is this assessment accurate? What is this novel's continuing impact on your life? Would you consider it the book that you are proudest of?
LS: Not counting Small Steps, I think Holes is my best book, in terms of plot, and setting, and the way the story revealed itself. It hasn't changed my life, other than that I have more money than I did before I wrote it. I'm still too close to Small Steps to compare it to Holes.
Why do you typically write only two hours each day?
LS: Small steps. Every time I start a new novel it seems like an impossible undertaking. If I tried to do too much too quickly, I would get lost and feel overwhelmed. I have to go slow, and give things a chance to take form and grow.



PRAISE

THE BOY WHO LOST HIS FACE
“Readers will empathize with David’s troubles and cheer his triumph in this delightful, funny book.”—Publishers Weekly


DOGS DON’T TELL JOKES
“Readers will laugh at Gary’s good jokes and groan at his clunkers while they cheer his transformation from goon to legitimate comedian.”—Booklist


HOLES

—A Newbery Medal Winner
—A National Book Award for Young People’s Literature Award Winner
—A Boston Globe–Horn Book Award Winner for Fiction
—An ALA Best Book for Young Adults
—An ALA Notable Children’s Book
—An ALA Quick Pick
—A Bulletin Blue Ribbon Book
—A Horn Book Fanfare
—A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
—A Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year
—A New York Times Book Review Notable Children’s Book of the Year

“We haven’t seen a book with this much plot, so suspensefully and expertly deployed, in too long a time. . . . Louis Sachar has long been a great and deserved favorite among children, despite the benign neglect of critics. But Holes is witness to its own theme: what goes around, comes around. Eventually.”—Starred, The Horn Book Magazine

“A multitude of colorful characters coupled with the skillful braiding of ethnic folklore, American legend, and contemporary issues is a brilliant achievement. There is no question, kids will love Holes.”—Starred, School Library Journal


MARVIN REDPOST: WHY PICK ON ME?
“The hilarious portrayal of grade-school relationships has tremendous child appeal.”—The Horn Book Magazine


MARVIN REDPOST: IS HE A GIRL?
“Sachar writes for beginning readers with a comic simplicity that is never banal. Here he gets a lot of fun out of the identity confusion, and kids will love the frankness about grade-school gender wars and social taboos.”—Booklist


MARVIN REDPOST: ALONE IN HIS TEACHER’S HOUSE
“Sachar’s finely tuned sense of how children think and feel make this fourth book about Marvin and his comic misadventures entertaining.”—The Horn Book Magazine


MARVIN REDPOST: A FLYING BIRTH DAY CAKE?
“Clipped sentences and short paragraphs are not only just right for new readers, they’re just right for the story-a smart, funny mist on the new-kid theme, reminding us that everyone feels alienated at one time or another.”—The Horn Book Magazine


THERE’S A BOY IN THE GIRLS’ BATHROOM
“A humorous and immensely appealing story.”—Kirkus Reviews

Praise

Praise

"Aside from being resoundingly funny, Sachar has a rare honesty about what children really encounter in the world." --The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

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