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  • Girls: What's So Bad About Being Good?
  • Written by Harriet S. Mosatche, Ph.D.
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  • Girls: What's So Bad About Being Good?
  • Written by Harriet S. Mosatche, Ph.D.
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Girls: What's So Bad About Being Good?

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How to Have Fun, Survive the Preteen Years, and Remain True to Yourself

Written by Harriet S. Mosatche, Ph.D.Author Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Harriet S. Mosatche, Ph.D.

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List Price: $9.99

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On Sale: July 20, 2011
Pages: | ISBN: 978-0-307-55640-0
Published by : Three Rivers Press Crown Archetype
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ABOUT THE BOOK ABOUT THE BOOK
ABOUT THE AUTHOR ABOUT THE AUTHOR
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Synopsis|Table of Contents

Synopsis

A Girl's Guide to Growing Up
Being a girl is a lot of fun most of the time. But some days are really difficult. Dealing with a body that is changing before everyone's eyes, increasing amounts of schoolwork, boys, other girls, friends, makeup, clothing, parents. Wow! Life as a preteen or early-teen girl is tough, and that's why every girl has questions about growing up. Fortunately, now you have some help.
Girls: What's So Bad About Being Good? is your new guide to surviving those trying times and feeling good about yourself in the end. Inside, a mom and her daughter—who's about the same age as you—team up to help you figure out what's really important in life and how you can become the person you want to be. You'll find some great ways to handle emotional issues and deal with daily crises as you discover how to:
·Develop a positive self-image
·Maintain healthy relationships with parents, friends, and boys
·Deal with peer pressure, bullies, brats, and violence
·Dream big and turn those dreams into reality!
·And so much more!
"A lively, relevant, and valuable resource that can not only empower but also help girls keep open the lines of communication with the important adults in their lives." —Marty Evans, national executive director, Girl Scouts of the USA
"A great book for preteen girls! The best of both worlds with the smarts of a mom and a daughter!" —Karen Bokram, editor in chief, Girls' Life magazine

Table of Contents

Content
Acknowledgments
Introduction

1. Will the Real You Please Stand Up?
Coming to Terms with Your Inner and Outer Self

2. Strong and Confident
Polishing Your People Skills and Learning to Lead

3. People to People
Nurturing Relationships with Family and Friends

4. Don't Mess with Me!
Conquering Challenges with Smart Choices

5. Lessons in Learning
Making Your Time Count in and out of School

6. Make It Happen in Your Community
Taking Action and Making a Difference

7. Global Citizens
Embracing Diversity and Making Friends Around the World

8. Dream On
Creating—and Managing—Your Future
Some Final Words
About the Authors
Index
Harriet S. Mosatche, Ph.D.

About Harriet S. Mosatche, Ph.D.

Harriet S. Mosatche, Ph.D. - Girls: What's So Bad About Being Good?
Harriet S. Mosatche, Ph.D., is the director of Program Development for Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. In that position, she writes or directs the writing of resources for girls from 5 to 17 and for the adults who work with them. Since 1997, Harriet and her daughter Liz have been offering advice in Ask Dr. M and Liz, a popular section of the Just 4 Girls pages of the national Girl Scout Web site.

In addition to her work with Girl Scouts, Harriet is a partner in OutPerform LLC, which offers consulting services to schools and community agencies in program development and evaluation. She also conducts workshops on child and adolescent development and family relationships for parents, kids, and teachers.

Harriet received her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the City University of New York. Prior to joining the Girl Scout organization, she was a college professor for a dozen years, with six of those years as chairperson of the Psychology Department at a New York City college.

Her publications, in addition to Girls: What's So Bad About Being Good?, include articles in scholarly journals and popular magazines as well as two books, the most recent being Too Old for This, Too Young for That! Your Survival Guide for the Middle-School Years (coauthored with Karen Unger), winner of the 2000 Gold Award winner for nonfiction from the National Association of Parenting Publications.

Harriet has volunteered as a Girl Scout leader since 1993 and now works with a troop of 12 and 13 year old Cadette Girl Scouts. She lives in New York with her husband, Ivan Lawner, and their two children, Rob and Liz.

Elizabeth (Liz) K. Lawner is a seventh-grader who has been offering advice to girls around the world since she was in the fourth grade. With her mom, Liz writes answers on the Ask Dr. M and Liz section of the Just 4 Girls pages of the national Girl Scout Web site.

Liz has her own business, Little Bits, selling hand-made miniatures and jewelry. She has studied dance—hip hop, jazz, and tap—since she was four and enjoys playing the piano. Liz is also a talented student and received the highest score in her school on the American Mathematics Competition in 2000.

Liz has been active in Girl Scouting since she was five years-old and is now a Cadette Girl Scout. She lives in New York with her parents and brother, Rob.
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A Girl's Guide to Growing Up

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