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  • The Black Grizzly of Whiskey Creek
  • Written by Sid Marty
  • Format: Trade Paperback | ISBN: 9780771056987
  • Our Price: $19.95
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The Black Grizzly of Whiskey Creek

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Synopsis|Excerpt

Synopsis

In describing the true events surrounding a series of frightening bear attacks in l980, a bestselling nature/adventure author explores our relationship with the great grizzly.

Many citizens of Banff, Alberta, valued living in a place where wildlife grazed on the front lawn; others saw wild bears as a mere roadside attraction. None were expecting the bear attacks that summer, which led to one man’s death. During the massive hunt that followed, Banff was portrayed in the international media as a town under siege by a killer bear, and the tourists stayed away. The pressure was on to find and destroy the Whiskey Creek mauler, but he evaded park wardens and struck again — and again. When the fight was over, the hard lessons learned led to changes that would save the lives of both bears and people in the coming years.

Sid Marty’s The Black Grizzly of Whiskey Creek is an evocative and gripping story that speaks to our complex and increasingly combative relationship with the wilderness and its inhabitants.


From the Hardcover edition.

Excerpt

There are trails near the timberline, connecting between the ranges, whose purpose is known to very few, because they are not part of the trail system used by humans. Known as bear roads, they tunnel through the krummholz and slide alder where most people stop, baffled, unwilling to get down on all fours and crawl, unsure of their welcome in that hedged darkness. They are roads of ancestral knowledge, passed on from the mother bear to the cubs, imprinted in the brain to be recalled later, perhaps some years after the cubs have dispersed, maybe long after the siblings have gone their separate ways. Mothers and cubs might meet again on those roads, and recognize each other, and pass each other by without doing harm.

One road, of many such, crosses rock slides where the shale is packed into the interstices between great fallen blocks of limestone by the coming and going of padded feet. Here a hole in the path marks where a boulder the size of a small car was grappled and shoved out of the way, and sent rolling down the mountain like local thunder. This road winds across avalanche chutes, over the flayed trunks of old-growth trees that can be three feet or more in diameter, trees that lived for a century or longer before a winter avalanche finally called them to account, leaving their bones like giant pick-up sticks between the boulders, the trunks now scarred by claw marks. Here and there will be a drift of snow, insulated by a layer of broken shale that fell, piece by piece, from the precipice high above earlier that spring, as meltwater loosened the rocks, so in the heat of summer there are still places where the traveller beast can stretch out and rub its back and cool off in the icy slush for a moment below a boiling of frustrated deer flies. The bear road curls through a mossy gulch now and then, where a brook purls down the mountain to form a pool of icy water in which a bear may stop to bathe its hot, cracked footpads in the mud

while slaking its thirst. And if, later, you came upon the spot by chance, you might think that a huge man had stood barefoot in the mud; you might wonder if the stories about Sasquatch are true, and then you might note how the mud is punctured at the end of each toe pad. And this fact will make you stand up quickly; it will make you turn around, and listen, and listen.

In the old-growth forest, where the deep layers of duff and moss sometimes serve as the flimsy roof over a rock crevice, a place to be sniffed at and passed by carefully, or else out on the flatter lie of a bog, the road is marked by tracks a foot deep and a foot or more long. These tracks were made over the centuries by the padded humanoid feet of bears that journey between mountain ranges; each has put its front foot and then the corresponding rear foot down in the same print the first of its tribe made here centuries before. It may seem as if this were a trail made by human footsteps, but you will look in vain for any other sign of their habitation or resort. There are no axe blazes, no fire circles or rusty tin cans. The road may be grown in with fresh green moss as if it had been unused for years, but it has not been forgotten, and won’t be as long as bears are allowed to live.


From the Hardcover edition.
Sid Marty

About Sid Marty

Sid Marty - The Black Grizzly of Whiskey Creek
Sid Marty’s work has been published in periodicals including Equinox, Canadian Geographic, Reader’s Digest, Canadian Business, and National Geographic Traveler. His prose and poetry have been included in a number of literary periodicals and anthologies and his books about life in the mountains and foothills of Canada’s west have been consistent bestsellers. Sid Marty lives and writes in the foothills of southwestern Alberta.
Praise

Praise

“Marty’s latest, The Black Grizzly of Whiskey Creek, is a work of poetic genius. The book combines the best of hard investigative reporting with the narrative power of the finest literary journalism. It moves along at the clip of a detective story. It’s also a daring work of the imagination — much of the action unfolds from the perspective of a bear... It’s as good as nature writing gets.”
— Terry Glavin, author of Waiting for the Macaws and Other Stories from the Age of Extinction

Praise for Switchbacks

“Some chapters will have your adrenalin coursing and your heart pounding; one or two others may make you weep. All of them will thrill you with the concrete vitality of landscape and language.” — Globe and Mail

Praise for Men for the Mountains
“This is a tour-de-force . . . with something vital to tell the myopic city dweller about what is happening to him in the Age of the Machine.” — Farley Mowat


From the Hardcover edition.

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