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The Daring Dozen: 12 Special Forces Legends of World War II

The Daring Dozen: 12 Special Forces Legends of World War II

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Add This - The Daring Dozen: 12 Special Forces Legends of World War II

Written by Gavin MortimerAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Gavin Mortimer

  • Format: Hardcover, 304 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing
  • On Sale: June 19, 2012
  • Price: $24.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-84908-842-8 (1-84908-842-X)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

In this new book by journalist Gavin Mortimer, The Daring Dozen reveals the 12 legendary special forces commanders of World War II. Prior to World War II the concept of ‘special forces’ simply didn't exist. But thanks to visionary leaders like David Stirling and Charles Hunter, our very concept of how wars can be fought and won have totally changed. But these 12 extraordinary men not only reshaped military policy, they led from the front, accompanying their troops into the heat of battle, from the sands of North Africa to jumping on D-Day and infiltrating behind enemy lines. Each embodies the true essence of courage, what Winston Churchill remarked ‘is esteemed [as] the first of human qualities.’ But Mortimer also offers a skilful analysis of their qualities as a military commander and the true impact their own personal actions, as well as those of their units, had on the eventual outcome of the war.