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Spaces of Global Capitalism

Spaces of Global Capitalism

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Written by David HarveyAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by David Harvey

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 154 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Verso
  • On Sale: May 17, 2006
  • Price: $26.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-84467-550-0 (1-84467-550-5)
about this book

Fiscal crises have cascaded across much of the developing world with devastating results, from Mexico to Indonesia, Russia and Argentina. The extreme volatility in contemporary political economic fortunes seems to mock our best efforts to understand the forces that drive development in the world economy.

David Harvey is the single most important geographer writing today and a leading social theorist of our age, offering a comprehensive critique of contemporary capitalism. In this fascinating book, he shows the way forward for just such an understanding, enlarging upon the key themes in his recent work: the development of neoliberalism, the spread of inequalities across the globe, and ‘space’ as a key theoretical concept.

Both a major declaration of a new research program and a concise introduction to David Harvey’s central concerns, this book will be essential reading for scholars and students across the humanities and social sciences.

“Harvey is a scholarly radical; his writing is free of journalistic clichés, full of facts and carefully thought-through ideas.”–Richard Sennett