Subjects Freshman Year Reading African American Studies African Studies American Studies Anthropology Art, Film, Music and Architecture Asian Studies Business and Economics Criminology Education Environmental Studies Foreign Language Instructional Materials Gender Studies History Irish Studies Jewish Studies Latin American & Caribbean Studies Law and Legal Studies Literature and Drama Literature in Spanish Media Issues, Journalism and Communication Middle East Studies Native American Studies Philosophy Political Science Psychology Reference Religion Russian and Eastern European Studies Science and Mathematics Sociology Study Aids


E-Newsletters: Click here to be notified of new titles in your field
Click here to request Desk/Exam copies
Freshman Year Reading
View Our Award Winners
Click here to view our Catalogs
Dossier K

Dossier K

Upgrade to the Flash 9 viewer for enhanced content, including the ability to browse & search through your favorite titles.
Click here to learn more!

Order Exam Copy
  • About this Book
E-Mail this Page Print this Page
Add This - Dossier K

Written by Imre KerteszAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Imre Kertesz
Translated by Tim WilkinsonAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Tim Wilkinson

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 224 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Melville House
  • On Sale: May 7, 2013
  • Price: $18.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-61219-202-4 (1-61219-202-5)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

The first and only memoir from the Nobel Prize—winning author, in the form of an illuminating, often funny, and often combative interview–with himself

Dossier K. is Imre Kertész’s response to the hasty biographies and profiles that followed his 2002 Nobel Prize for Literature–an attempt to set the record straight.

The result is an extraordinary self-portrait, in which Kertész interrogates himself about the course of his own remarkable life, moving from memories of his childhood in Budapest, his imprisonment in Nazi death camps and the forged record that saved his life, his experiences as a censored journalist in postwar Hungary under successive totalitarian communist regimes, and his eventual turn to fiction, culminating in the novels–such as Fatelessness, Fiasco, and Kaddish for an Unborn Child–that have established him as one of the most powerful, unsentimental, and imaginatively daring writers of our time.

In this wide-ranging and provocative book, Kertész continues to delve into the questions that have long occupied him: the legacy of the Holocaust, the distinctions drawn between fiction and reality, and what he calls “that wonderful burden of being responsible for oneself.”

“Kertész, like Beckett, is deadly serious and his work is a profound meditation on the great and enduring themes of love, death and the problem of evil.” –John Banville, The Nation

“An unflinching memoir in the form of a Socratic dialogue with himself about his extraordinary life…Kertész is meditative, insightful, profound.” –Publisher’s Weekly (starred review)

“Kertész’s sensibility defies classification. To call him unique would be to miss the point; it would diminish his frankness, his modesty, his shocking honesty that, he would remind us, is not the same as telling the truth…A necessary work, beautifully translated.” –ALA Booklist