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Roberto Bolano: The Last Interview

Roberto Bolano: The Last Interview

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Add This - Roberto Bolano: The Last Interview

Written by Roberto BolaņoAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Roberto Bolaņo
Translated by Sybil PerezAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Sybil Perez
Introduction by Marcela ValdesAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Marcela Valdes

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 128 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Melville House
  • On Sale: December 6, 2011
  • Price: $15.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-61219-095-2 (1-61219-095-2)
Also available as an eBook and a trade paperback.
about this book

With the release of Roberto Bolaño’s The Savage Detectives in 1998, journalist Monica Maristain discovered a writer “capable of befriending his readers.” After exchanging several letters with Bolaño, Maristain formed a friendship of her own, culminating in an extensive interview with the novelist about truth and consequences, an interview that turned out to be Bolaño’s last.

Appearing for the first time in English, Bolaño’s final interview is accompanied by a collection of conversations with reporters stationed throughout Latin America, providing a rich context for the work of the writer who, according to essayist Marcela Valdes, is “a T.S. Eliot or Virginia Woolf of Latin American letters.” As in all of Bolaño’s work, there is also wide-ranging discussion of the author’s many literary influences. (Explanatory notes on authors and titles that may be unfamiliar to English-language readers are included here.)

The interviews, all of which were completed during the writing of the gigantic 2666, also address Bolaño’s deepest personal concerns, from his domestic life and two young children to the realities of a fatal disease.

“The real thing and the rarest.” —Susan Sontag

“By writing across the grain of his doubts about what literature can do, how much it can discover or dare pronounce the names of our world’s disasters, Bolaño has proven it can do anything, and for an instant, at least, given a name to the unnamable.”—Jonathan Lethem