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The Alteration

The Alteration

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Add This - The Alteration

Written by Kingsley AmisAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Kingsley Amis
Introduction by William GibsonAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by William Gibson

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 256 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: NYRB Classics
  • On Sale: May 7, 2013
  • Price: $14.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-59017-617-7 (1-59017-617-0)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Winner - John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science-Fiction Novel, 1976

In Kingsley Amis’s virtuoso foray into alternate history, it is 1976 but the modern world is a medieval relic, frozen in intellectual and spiritual time ever since Martin Luther was promoted to pope back in the sixteenth century. Stephen the Third, the king of England, has just died, and Mass (Mozart’s second requiem) is about to be sung to lay him to rest. In the choir is our hero, Hubert Anvil, an extremely ordinary ten-year-old boy with a faultless voice. In the audience is a select group of experts whose job is to determine whether that faultless voice should be preserved by performing a certain operation. After all, any sacrifice is worth it for the perfection of art.

How Hubert realizes what lies in store for him and how he deals with the whirlpool of piety, menace, terror, and passion that he soon finds himself in are the subject of a classic piece of counterfactual fiction to equal Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle.

“One of the best–possibly the best–alternate-worlds novels in existence” –Philip K. Dick

“Buoyantly inventive from its ground-plan to its remotest pinnacles and twirly bits, Kingsley Amis’s new novel has almost nothing expectable about it, except that it is a study of tyranny.” –John Carey, New Statesman

The Green Man and The Alteration will retain their important places in the history of supernatural fiction and science fiction.” –Michael Dirda

“In one of his funniest novels, The Alteration, Kingsley Amis imagined a counterfactual world in which the Reformation had failed. Martin Luther had not plunged northern Europe into religious revolt, but instead became Pope Germanicus I. Prince Arthur of England did not die, so his odious brother Henry never became king. Henry's malcontent Protestant followers, after an abortive rebellion, were banished to New England, where they eventually invented free trade, electricity and personal hygiene. So Europe in the 1960s groaned under a papistical Haps burg tyranny. Harold Wilson was pope, dispensing tea in the Vatican (‘Shall we be mother?’), and papal scouts combed English cathedrals for likely singing boys who, after suitable surgery (‘The Alteration’), became castrati in the Sistine Chapel choir.” –Eamon Duffy, Sunday Times (UK)

“Amis, not content with writing scholarly treatments of the subject, produced a historical/futurological novel, The Alteration…I might add that the subject of sex in this work is introduced in the most radical and subversive way, though without the smallest hint of the pornographic.” –Christopher Hitchens, The Atlantic Monthly