Subjects Freshman Year Reading African American Studies African Studies American Studies Anthropology Art, Film, Music and Architecture Asian Studies Business and Economics Criminology Education Environmental Studies Foreign Language Instructional Materials Gender Studies History Irish Studies Jewish Studies Latin American & Caribbean Studies Law and Legal Studies Literature and Drama Literature in Spanish Media Issues, Journalism and Communication Middle East Studies Native American Studies Philosophy Political Science Psychology Reference Religion Russian and Eastern European Studies Science and Mathematics Sociology Study Aids


E-Newsletters: Click here to be notified of new titles in your field
Click here to request Desk/Exam copies
Freshman Year Reading
View Our Award Winners
Click here to view our Catalogs
Tyrant Banderas

Tyrant Banderas

Upgrade to the Flash 9 viewer for enhanced content, including the ability to browse & search through your favorite titles.
Click here to learn more!

Order Exam Copy
  • About this Book
E-Mail this Page Print this Page
Add This - Tyrant Banderas

Written by Ramon del Valle-InclanAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Ramon del Valle-Inclan
Translated by Peter BushAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Peter Bush
Introduction by Alberto ManguelAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Alberto Manguel

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 224 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: NYRB Classics
  • On Sale: August 14, 2012
  • Price: $14.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-59017-498-2 (1-59017-498-4)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

The first great twentieth-century novel of dictatorship, and the avowed inspiration for García Márquez’s The Autumn of the Patriarch and Roa Bastos’s I, the Supreme, Tyrant Banderas is a dark and dazzling portrayal of a mythical Latin American Republic in the grip of a monster. Valle-Inclán, one of the masters of Spanish modernism, combines the splintered points of view of a cubist painting with the campy excesses of 19thcentury
serial fiction to paint an astonishing picture of a ruthless tyrant facing armed revolt.

It is the Day of the Dead, and revolution has broken out, creating mayhem from Baby Roach’s Cathouse to the Harris Circus to the deep jungle of Tico Maipú. The tyrant steps forth, assuring all that he is in favor of freedom of assembly and democratic opposition. Meanwhile, his secret police lock up, torture, and execute students and Indian peasants in a sinister castle by the sea where even the sharks have tired of a diet of revolutionary flesh. Then the opposition strikes back. They besiege the dictator’s citadel, hoping to bring justice to a downtrodden, starving populace.

Peter Bush’s new translation of Valle-Inclán’s seminal novel, the first into English since 1929, reveals a writer whose tragic sense of humor is as memorably grotesque and disturbing as Goya’s in his The Disasters of War.

“Ramón del Valle-Inclán, the most pioneering Spanish dramatist of this century . . . anticipates most of the key movements in modern drama. He is notoriously unclassifiable but was both and Expressionist and an Absurdist before the event. He created a genre he called ‘esperpento’ which broadly means grotesque tragic-comedy, and what is fascinating is that he anticipates Beckett, Ionesco, Genet and Arrabal without in any way sacrificing his own radical utopianism. He is one of the seminal figures in modern drama: erotic, anarchic and Galician poet of the grotesque.” –Michael Billington, Guardian

“Because dictators have been a staple of Latin history, they’re a staple of the Latin novel. Spaniard Ramon del Valle-Inclan broke ground in 1926 with Tirano Banderas.” –The Miami Herald

“It is a dark, violent, gorey work whose unbridled lyricism cannot mask its many horrors. . . . Tirano Banderas, which Valle Inclan wrote in his 20s, is Cubist in that its writing is highly fragmented, while its range of deep, intense colours is reminiscent of Goya. But its main characteristic is esperpento, a genre created by Ville-Inclan himself. Esperpento is a mixture of terror and comedy, in which a character from tragedy is reduced to the dimensions of a fairground huckster. Tirano Banderas is a farce written with a poisoned pen.” –Manchester Guardian Weekly

Tirano Banderas was the first novel to describe a South American dictator. It was written before other authors, such as Asturias and Garcia Marquez. . . . All the horrible things describe in the novel are still a very real threat in present day Latin America.” –Lautaro Murua, Argentinean actor