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What's God Got to Do with It?

What's God Got to Do with It?

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Add This - What's God Got to Do with It?

Edited by Tim PageAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Tim Page

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 144 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Steerforth
  • On Sale: August 16, 2005
  • Price: $14.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-58642-096-3 (1-58642-096-8)
about this book

Robert Ingersoll (1833—1899) is one of the great lost figures in United States history, all but forgotten at just the time America needs him most. An outspoken and unapologetic agnostic, fervent champion of the separation of church and state, and tireless advocate of the rights of women and African Americans, he drew enormous audiences in the late nineteenth century with his lectures on “freethought.” His admirers included Mark Twain and Thomas A. Edison, who said Ingersoll had “all the attributes of a perfect man” and went so far as to make an early recording of Ingersoll’s voice.

The publication of What’s God Got to Do with It? will return Robert Ingersoll and his ideas to American political discourse. Edited and with a biographical introduction by Pulitzer Prize winner Tim Page, this new popular collection of Ingersoll’s thought – distilled from the twelve-volume set of his works, his copious letters, and various newspaper interviews – promises to put Ingersoll back where he belongs, in the forefront of independent American thought.