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Toward a Spiritual Psychotherapy

Toward a Spiritual Psychotherapy

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Written by Hunter Beaumont, Ph.D.Author Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Hunter Beaumont, Ph.D.
Foreword by John B. Cobb, Jr.Author Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by John B. Cobb, Jr.

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 232 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: North Atlantic Books
  • On Sale: April 3, 2012
  • Price: $17.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-58394-370-0 (1-58394-370-6)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Toward a Spiritual Psychotherapy collects a series of lectures presented by psychologist Hunter Beaumont over a 10-year period. Covering such themes as relationships, family, healing, grief, mourning, and death, the book features case stories that demonstrate clients’ healing experiences.

Practicing in Germany for the past 30 years, Hunter Beaumont has had the unique experience of working with World War II and Holocaust survivors and their descendants. Through this work he discovered that healing requires attending to the soul, a process he describes as an “inner ‘felt sense’ and common, everyday dimension of experience.” Demonstrating how therapists can integrate this more spiritual approach into their practices, Beaumont highlights the particular successes of the innovative family constellations therapy. Developed by German psychologist Bert Hellinger and expanded by Beaumont and others, this therapy takes place in a group setting, with group members standing in for family members or others involved in the client’s problem. A crucial part of Beaumont’s spiritual psychotherapy practice, this method has helped many of his clients release and resolve profound tensions, and offers hope to readers recovering from trauma or PTSD, or simply trying to navigate life’s difficulties.