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The Class

The Class

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Written by Francois BegaudeauAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Francois Begaudeau
Translated by Linda AsherAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Linda Asher

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 272 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Seven Stories Press
  • On Sale: April 7, 2009
  • Price: $17.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-58322-885-2 (1-58322-885-3)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Winner of the Prix France Culture/Télérama prize, The Class explores timely issues of race, class, identity, colonial history, immigration, and education, “suspend[ing] judgment and liberat[ing] the raw words of kids in a deconsecrated classroom” (Le Monde). The novel’s eponymous film version, directed by Laurent Cantet, starring author Bégaudeau as himself, won the Palme d'Or at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival and was nominated for the 2009 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

The Class is a prime document of French post-colonial blues, though its relevance to American urban education could not be any greater if it had been made in the Bronx or South Los Angeles.” — David Denby, The New Yorker

“I was excited to see The Class, because it promised to be the opposite of the inspirational, devotes-everything-to-her-craft, superhero teacher movie. Instead, it was something wildly different: IT WAS REAL.” — Mei Flower, high school teacher and blogger.