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The Zinn Reader

The Zinn Reader

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Add This - The Zinn Reader

Written by Howard ZinnAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Howard Zinn

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 752 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Seven Stories Press
  • On Sale: July 7, 2009
  • Price: $21.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-58322-870-8 (1-58322-870-5)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

No other radical historian has reached so many hearts and minds as Howard Zinn. It is rare that a historian of the Left has managed to retain as much credibility while refusing to let his academic mantle change his beautiful writing style from being anything but direct, forthright, and accessible. Whether his subject is war, race, politics, economic justice, or history itself, each of his works serves as a reminder that to embrace one’s subjectivity can mean embracing one’s humanity, that heart and mind can speak with one voice. Here, in six sections, is the historian’s own choice of his shorter essays on some of the most critical problems facing America throughout its history, and today.

“A welcome collection of essays and occasional pieces by the dean of radical American historians.” — Kirkus Reviews