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Tupperware

Tupperware

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Add This - Tupperware

Written by Alison J. ClarkeAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Alison J. Clarke

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 256 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Smithsonian Books
  • On Sale: February 17, 2001
  • Price: $16.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-56098-920-2 (1-56098-920-3)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

From Wonder Bowls to Ice-Tup molds to Party Susans, Tupperware has become an icon of suburban living. Tracing the fortunes of Earl Tupper’s polyethylene containers from early design to global distribution, Alison J. Clarke explains how Tupperware tapped into potent commercial and social forces, becoming a prevailing symbol of late twentieth-century consumer culture.

Invented by Earl Tupper in the 1940s to promote thrift and cleanliness, the pastel plasticwares were touted as essential to a postwar lifestyle that emphasized casual entertaining and celebrated America's material abundance. By the mid-1950s the Tupperware party, which gathered women in a hostess’s home for lively product demonstrations and sales, was the foundation of a multimillion-dollar business that proved as innovative as the containers themselves. Clarke shows how the “party plan” direct sales system, by creating a corporate culture based on women’s domestic lives, played a greater role than patented seals and streamlined design in the success of Tupperware.

“Alison Clarke tells [Tupperware’s story] with wit and erudition.”–Newsweek

“This detailed and entertaining book explores how the plastic storage containers known as Tupperware rose to prominence in 1950s America. . . . Tupperware was more than just a clever use of plastic and an equally clever marketing tool; it was a symbol of its time and a perfect product for a consumerist age.”–American History

“[Tupperware] explores that domestic icon of suburbia and its role in feminist history.”–Washington Post