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Kaddish for an Unborn Child

Kaddish for an Unborn Child

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Add This - Kaddish for an Unborn Child

Written by Imre KerteszAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Imre Kertesz
Translated by Tim WilkinsonAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Tim Wilkinson

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 132 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: November 9, 2004
  • Price: $14.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-7862-2 (1-4000-7862-8)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

The first word in this mesmerizing novel by the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature is “No.” It is how the novel’s narrator, a middle-aged Hungarian-Jewish writer, answers an acquaintance who asks him if he has a child. It is the answer he gave his wife (now ex-wife) years earlier when she told him that she wanted one. The loss, longing and regret that haunt the years between those two “no”s give rise to one of the most eloquent meditations ever written on the Holocaust.

As Kertesz’s narrator addresses the child he couldn’t bear to bring into the world he ushers readers into the labyrinth of his consciousness, dramatizing the paradoxes attendant on surviving the catastrophe of Auschwitz. Kaddish for an Unborn Child is a work of staggering power, lit by flashes of perverse wit and fueled by the energy of its wholly original voice.


“Condenses a lifetime into a story told in a single night . . . exhilarating for [its] creative energy.” —World Literature

“In his writing Imre Kertesz explores the possibility of continuing to live and think as an individual in an era in which the subjection of human beings to social forces has become increasingly complete. upholds the fragile experience of the individual against the barbaric arbitrariness of history.” —The Swedish Academy, awarding the Nobel Prize in Literature 2002