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Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes

Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes

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Written by Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.Author Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 224 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: June 12, 2007
  • Price: $15.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-7749-6 (1-4000-7749-4)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

At the heart of this landmark collection of essays rests a single question: What impact, good or bad, immediate or long-range, did Lewis and Clark’s journey have on the Indians whose homelands they traversed? The nine writers in this volume each provide their own unique answers; from Pulitzer prize-winner N. Scott Momaday, who offers a haunting essay evoking the voices of the past; to Debra Magpie Earling’s illumination of her ancestral family, their survival, and the magic they use to this day; to Mark N. Trahant’s attempt to trace his own blood back to Clark himself; and Roberta Conner’s comparisons of the explorer’s journals with the accounts of the expedition passed down to her. Incisive and compelling, these essays shed new light on our understanding of this landmark journey into the American West.


“A remarkable book…gives both the event and the era a fresh perspective.”
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“Every story has two sides, and until now, the Indian point of view has scarcely been heard.”
San Francisco Chronicle

“[A] compulsively readable book…should be required reading for all Americans.”
Santa Cruz Sentinel