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Are You Really Going to Eat That?

Are You Really Going to Eat That?

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Add This - Are You Really Going to Eat That?

Written by Robb WalshAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Robb Walsh

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 288 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • On Sale: November 2, 2004
  • Price: $14.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-7716-8 (1-4000-7716-8)
about this book

From the top of the Blue Mountains of Jamaica for the perfect cup of coffee to the jungles of Thailand for an encounter with the abominably smelly “stinkfruit,” Robb Wals has traveled the globe, immersing himself in some of the world’s most interesting culinary phenomena. In Are You Really Going to Eat That? Walsh offers a collection of his best essays over the past ten years, along with some of his favorite recipes.

For Walsh, food is a window on culture, and his essays brim with insights into our society and those around us. Whether he’s discussing halal organic farming with Muslims, traversing the steep hills of Trinidad in search of hot-sauce makers, or savoring the disappearing art of black Southern cooking with a inmate-chef in a Texas penitentiary, Walsh has a unique talent for taking our understanding of food to a deeper level.


“The Indiana Jones of food writers.” —Liane Hansen, Weekend Edition

“Walsh approaches food as an amateur culinary anthropologist, exploring the origins and preparations of foods, and seasoning his tales with cultural lore. . . . A treat for cooks and food lovers alike.” —The Christian Science Monitor

“[Walsh] can best be described as a cultural anthropologist with a serious face-stuffing issue. . . . The nice thing about Walsh’s writing is that he’s always aware of the big implications lurking around each subject but resists the temptations of didacticism.” —The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“[Walsh writes] with gusto about everything from the blue-footed chickens of Bresse to Spam musubi on the Kona coast. He ostensibly is discussing food, but is actually taking on far more.” —Austin Chronicle