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Tearing Down the Wall of Sound

Tearing Down the Wall of Sound

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Add This - Tearing Down the Wall of Sound

Written by Mick BrownAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Mick Brown

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 512 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: May 13, 2008
  • Price: $16.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-7661-1 (1-4000-7661-7)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

He had a number one hit at eighteen. He was a millionaire with his own record label at twenty-two. He was, according to Tom Wolfe, “the first tycoon of teen.” Phil Spector owned pop music. From the Crystals, the Ronettes (whose lead singer, Ronnie, would become his second wife), and the Righteous Brothers to the Beatles (together and singly) and finally the seventies punk icons The Ramones, Spector produced hit after hit. But then he became pop music's most famous recluse. Until one day in the spring of 2007, when his name hit the tabloids, connected to a horrible crime.

In Tearing Down the Wall of Sound, Mick Brown, who was the last journalist to interview Spector before his arrest, tells the full story of the troubled musical genius.

“Fascinating, detailed. . . . A great portrait of where genius and madness meet.”
Rocky Mountain News

“Bloodcurdling biography. . . . A portrait of pure self-interest and cruelty, tempered only slightly by the great musical achievements of Mr. Spector's golden age in the early 1960s.”
The New York Times

“A bruising portrait of legendary music producer Phil Spector.”
Entertainment Weekly

“Gripping. . . . Brown succeeds in providing a well-rounded portrait of someone the public never understood. And it comes at just the right time, too-when they're asking more questions about him than ever.”
The Washington Post