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Why Things Break

Why Things Break

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Add This - Why Things Break

Written by Mark EberhartAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Mark Eberhart

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 272 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Broadway Books
  • On Sale: September 28, 2004
  • Price: $14.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-4883-0 (1-4000-4883-4)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Why Things Break explores the fascinating question of what holds things together (for a while), what breaks them apart, and why the answers have a direct bearing on our everyday lives.

When Mark Eberhart was growing up in the 1960s, he learned that splitting an atom leads to a terrible explosion—which prompted him to worry that when he cut into a stick of butter, he would inadvertently unleash a nuclear cataclysm. Years later, as a chemistry professor, he remembered this childhood fear when he began to ponder the fact that we know more about how to split an atom than we do about how a pane of glass breaks.

In Why Things Break, Eberhar takes students on a remarkable and entertaining exploration of all the cracks, clefts, fissures, and faults examined in the field of materials science and the many astonishing discoveries that have been made about everything from the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger to the crashing of a computer hard drive. Understanding why things break is crucial to modern life on every level, from personal safety to macroeconomics, but as Eberhart reveals here, it is also an area of cutting-edge science that is as provocative as it is illuminating.