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Notes from Underground

Notes from Underground

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Add This - Notes from Underground

Written by Fyodor DostoevskyAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Translated by Richard PevearAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Richard Pevear and Larissa VolokhonskyAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Larissa Volokhonsky

  • Format: Hardcover, 160 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Everyman's Library
  • On Sale: March 23, 2004
  • Price: $21.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-4191-6 (1-4000-4191-0)
Also available as an eBook and a trade paperback.
about this book

Dostoevsky’s most revolutionary novel, Notes from Underground marks the dividing line between 19th- and 20th-century fiction, and between the visions of self each century embodied. One of the most remarkable characters in literature, the unnamed narrator is a former official who has defiantly withdrawn into an underground existence. In full retreat from society, he scrawls a passionate, obsessive, self-contradictory narrative that serves as a devastating attack on social utopianism and an assertion of man’s essentially irrational nature.

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, whose Dostoevsky translations have become the standard, give us a brilliantly faithful edition of this classic novel, conveying all the tragedy and tormented comedy of the original.