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Eat, Drink, and Be Merry

Eat, Drink, and Be Merry

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Add This - Eat, Drink, and Be Merry

Edited by Peter WashingtonAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Peter Washington

  • Format: Hardcover, 256 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Everyman's Library
  • On Sale: April 8, 2003
  • Price: $14.95
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-4023-0 (1-4000-4023-X)
about this book

Eating and drinking and the rituals that go with them are at least as important as loving in most people's lives, yet for every hundred anthologies of poems about love, hardly one is devoted to the pleasures of the table. Eat, Drink, and Be Merry abundantly fills the gap.

All kinds of foods and beverages are laid out in these pages, along with picnics and banquets, intimate suppers and quiet dinners, noisy parties and public celebrations—in poems by Horace, Catullus, Hafiz, Rumi, Rilke, Moore, Nabokov, Updike, Mandelstam, Stevens, and many others. From Sylvia Plath's ecstatic vision of juice-laden berries in "Blackberrying" to D. H. Lawrence's lush celebration of “Figs,” from the civilized comfort of Noel Coward’s “Something on a Tray” to the salacious provocation of Swift’s “Oysters,” from Li Po on “Drinking Alone” to Baudelaire on “The Soul of Wine,” and from Emily Dickinson’s “Forbidden Fruit” to Elizabeth Bishop’s “A Miracle for Breakfast,” Eat, Drink, and Be Merry serves up a tantalizing and variegated literary feast.