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I Saw Ramallah

I Saw Ramallah

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Written by Mourid BarghoutiAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Mourid Barghouti
Translated by Ahdaf SoueifAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Ahdaf Soueif
Introduction by Edward W. SaidAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Edward W. Said

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 208 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • On Sale: May 13, 2003
  • Price: $15.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-3266-2 (1-4000-3266-0)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Barred from his homeland after 1967’s Six-Day War, the poet Mourid Barghouti spent thirty years in exile—shuttling among the world’s cities, yet secure in none of them; separated from his family for years at a time; never certain whether he was a visitor, a refugee, a citizen, or a guest. As he returns home for the first time since the Israeli occupation, Barghouti crosses a wooden bridge over the Jordan River into Ramallah and is unable to recognize the city of his youth. Sifting through memories of the old Palestine as they come up against what he now encounters in this mere “idea of Palestine,” he discovers what it means to be deprived not only of a homeland but of “the habitual place and status of a person.” A tour de force of memory and reflection, lamentation and resilience, I Saw Ramallah is a deeply humane book, essential to any balanced understanding of today’s Middle East.

“The most eloquent statement in English of what it is like to be a Palestinian today. . . . No other book so well explains the background to recent events in Palestine/Israel.” —The Times Literary Supplement

“An important literary event. . . . One of the finest existential accounts of Palestinian displacement that we now have.” —Edward W. Said, from the Foreword

“Forceful, lyrical, evocative. . . . A wonderful read.” —The Washington Report on Middle East Affairs