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Apex Hides the Hurt

Apex Hides the Hurt

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Written by Colson WhiteheadAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Colson Whitehead

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 224 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • On Sale: January 9, 2007
  • Price: $15.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-3126-9 (1-4000-3126-5)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

The town of Winthrop has decided it needs a new name. The resident software millionaire wants to call it New Prospera; the mayor wants to return to the original choice of the founding black settlers; and the town’s aristocracy sees no reason to change the name at all. What they need, they realize, is a nomenclature consultant. And, it turns out, the consultant needs them. But in a culture overwhelmed by marketing, the name is everything and our hero’s efforts may result in not just a new name for the town but a new and subtler truth about it as well.


“Wickedly funny. . . . Whitehead is making a strong case for a new name of his own: that of the best of the new generation of American novelists.” —The Boston Globe

“A brilliant, witty, and subtle novel, written in a most engaging style, with tremendous aptness of language and command of plot.”
The New York Review of Books

“Terrific. . . . Inspired. . . . Engaging, exuding energy. . . . Will have you nodding in wonder.” —The Miami Herald

“Dazzling. . . . Gorgeous, expertly crafted sentences. . . . An eloquent novel about racial identity in America.” —Newsweek

“Brilliant. . . . Exhilarating. . . . What keeps you reading this critique of language is its language, and our perverse delight in the ingenious abuse of words.” —The New York Times