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The Loss of El Dorado

The Loss of El Dorado

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Written by V.S. NaipaulAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by V.S. Naipaul

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 400 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: April 8, 2003
  • Price: $17.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-4000-3076-7 (1-4000-3076-5)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

The history of Trinidad begins with a delusion: the belief that somewhere nearby on the South American mainland lay El Dorado, the mythical kingdom of gold. In this extraordinary and often gripping book, V. S. Naipaul—himself a native of Trinidad—shows how that delusion drew a small island into the vortex of world events, making it the object of Spanish and English colonial designs and a mecca for treasure-seekers, slave-traders, and revolutionaries.

Amid massacres and poisonings, plunder and multinational intrigue, two themes emerge: the grinding down of the Aborigines during the long rivalries of the El Dorado quest and, two hundred years later, the man-made horror of slavery. An accumulation of casual, awful detail takes us as close as we can get to day-to-day life in the slave colony, where, in spite of various titles of nobility, only an opportunistic, near-lawless community exists, always fearful of slave suicide or poison, of African sorcery and revolt. Naipaul tells this labyrinthine story with assurance, withering irony, and lively sympathy. The result is historical writing at its highest level.


“History as literature, meticulously researched and masterfully written.” —The New York Times Book Review

“A formidable achievement. . . . No historian has attempted to weave together in so subtle a manner the threads of the most complex and turbulent period of Caribbean history.” —The Times Literary Supplement

“Brilliant. . . . Startling.” —New Statesman

“A remarkable book. . . . Intelligent, humane, brilliantly written.” —Book World