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West Dickens Avenue

West Dickens Avenue

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Written by John CorbettAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by John Corbett

  • Format: Paperback, 288 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Presidio Press
  • On Sale: February 3, 2004
  • Price: $7.99
  • ISBN: 978-0-89141-835-1 (0-89141-835-0)
Also available as an abridged audiobook download and an eBook.
about this book

In January 1968, John Corbett and his fellow leathernecks of the 26th Marine Regiment fortified a remote outpost at a place in South Vietnam called Khe Sanh. Within days of their arrival, twenty thousand North Vietnamese soldiers surrounded the base. What followed over the next seventy-seven days became one of the deadliest fights of the Vietnam War—and one of the greatest battles in military history.

Private First Class Corbett made do with little or no sleep for days on end. The enemy bombarded the base incessantly. Extremes of heat, cold, and fog added to the misery, as did all manner of wounds and injuries too minor to justify evacuation from frontline positions. The emotional toll was tremendous as the Marines saw their friends suffer and die every day of the siege. Corbett relates these experiences through the eyes of a twenty-year-old but with the mind and maturity of a man now in his fifties. His story of life, death, and growing up on the front lines at Khe Sanh speaks for all of the Marines caught up in the epic siege of the Vietnam War.