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Nonviolence

Nonviolence

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Written by Mark KurlanskyAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Mark Kurlansky
Foreword by Dalai LamaAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Dalai Lama

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 224 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Modern Library
  • On Sale: April 8, 2008
  • Price: $15.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-8129-7447-8 (0-8129-7447-6)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

In this timely, highly original, and controversial narrative, New York Times bestselling author Mark Kurlansky discusses nonviolence as a distinct entity, a course of action, rather than a mere state of mind. Nonviolence can and should be a technique for overcoming social injustice and ending wars, he asserts, which is why it is the preferred method of those who speak truth to power.

Nonviolence is a sweeping yet concise history that moves from ancient Hindu times to present-day conflicts raging in the Middle East and elsewhere. Kurlansky also brings into focus just why nonviolence is a “dangerous” idea, and asks such provocative questions as: Is there such a thing as a “just war”? Could nonviolence have worked against even the most evil regimes in history?

Kurlansky draws from history twenty-five provocative lessons on the subject that we can use to effect change today. He shows how, time and again, violence is used to suppress nonviolence and its practitioners–Gandhi and Martin Luther King, for example; that the stated deterrence value of standing national armies and huge weapons arsenals is, at best, negligible; and, encouragingly, that much of the hard work necessary to begin a movement to end war is already complete. It simply needs to be embraced and accelerated.

Engaging, scholarly, and brilliantly reasoned, Nonviolence is a work that compels readers to look at history in an entirely new way.