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Notes of a Native Son

Notes of a Native Son

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Add This - Notes of a Native Son

Written by James BaldwinAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by James Baldwin
Foreword by Edward P. JonesAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Edward P. Jones

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 192 pages
  • Publisher: Beacon Press
  • On Sale: November 20, 2012
  • Price: $15.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-8070-0623-8 (0-8070-0623-8)
Also available as an eBook and a hardcover.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

James Baldwin (1924–1987) was a novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic, and one of America's foremost writers. His essays, such as “Notes of a Native Son” (1955), explore palpable yet unspoken intricacies of racial, sexual, and class distinctions in Western societies, most notably in mid-twentieth-century America. A Harlem, New York, native, he primarily made his home in the south of France.

His novels include Giovanni’s Room (1956), about a white American expatriate who must come to terms with his homosexuality, and Another Country (1962), about racial and gay sexual tensions among New York intellectuals. His inclusion of gay themes resulted in much savage criticism from the black community. Going to Meet the Man (1965) and Tell Me How Long the Train’s Been Gone (1968) provided powerful descriptions of American racism. As an openly gay man, he became increasingly outspoken in condemning discrimination against lesbian and gay people.