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Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus

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Add This - Emma Lazarus

Written by Esther SchorAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Esther Schor

  • Format: Hardcover, 368 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Schocken
  • On Sale: September 5, 2006
  • Price: $27.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-8052-4216-4 (0-8052-4216-3)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Emma Lazarus’s most famous poem gave a voice to the Statue of Liberty, but her remarkable life has remained a mystery until now. She was a woman so far ahead of her time that we are still scrambling to catch up with her–a feminist, a Zionist, and an internationally famous Jewish American writer before thse categories even existed.

Drawing upon a cache of personal letters undiscovered until the 1980, Esther Schor brings this vital woman to life in all her complexity. Born into a wealthy Sephardic family in 1849, Lazarus published her first volume of verse at seventeen and gained entrée into New York’s elite literary circles. Although she once referred to her family as “outlaw” Jews, she felt a deep attachment to Jewish history and peoplehood. Her compassion for the downtrodden Jews of Eastern Europe–refugees whose lives had little in common with her own–helped redefine the meaning of America itself.

In this groundbreaking biography, Schor argues persuasively for Lazarus’s place in history as a poet, an activist, and a prophet of the world we all inhabit today–a world that she helped to invent.

“Schor brings to life the complicated, passionate woman who left us our proudest national image. A work of great empathy an meticulous historical research.”
—Kevin Baker, author of Paradise Alley

“In this luminous, enthralling biography, Esther Schor recovers one of the outstanding women of nineteenth-century letters, who while inventing her life as an American Jewish writer discovered a larger poetic mission for the entire nation.”
—Sean Wilentz, author of The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln

“Esther Schor, herself a poet of authentic distinction, has composed a very moving and highly useful biographical critique of Emma Lazarus, a permanent poet in American and in Jewish tradition.”
—Harold Bloom, author of The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages

“It is a rare book indeed that so skillfully melds biography, literary analysis, and cultural history. In describing Emma Lazarus and her circle, Schor tells the story of American Jewry in the nineteenth century, paints a portrait of literary New York in one of its heydays, explicates many beautiful and long-neglected poems, and instills in us a canny affection for a subject who is forceful and sometimes overbearing but also brilliant and compassionate. Schor’s prose is as lyrical and rich in images as the poetry she describes in this intimate, often touching volume.”
—Andrew Solomon, author of The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression

“Schor sets a new standard for scholarship on Emma Lazarus; previous biographies may now be discarded. She also understands Emma Lazarus’s significance in ways that no previous biographer has. That she is able to do all of this in an engaging short narrative is something of a miracle.”
—Jonathan Sarna, author of American Judaism