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The Greatest Game

The Greatest Game

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Add This - The Greatest Game

Written by Todd DenaultAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Todd Denault

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 336 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart
  • On Sale: October 4, 2011
  • Price: $19.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-7710-2635-5 (0-7710-2635-8)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

This game wasn’t about money, points, or trophies. Instead it was played for pride, both personal and national. It was a confrontation twenty years in the making and it marked a turning point in the history of hockey.

On December 31, 1975, the Montreal Canadiens, the most successful franchise in the NHL, hosted the touring Central Red Army, the dominant team in the Soviet Union. For three hours millions of people in both Canada and the Soviet Union were glued to their television sets. What transpired that evening was a game that surpassed all the hype and was subsequently referred to as “the greatest game ever played.” Held at the height of the Cold War, this remarkable contest transcended sports and took on serious cultural, sociological, and political overtones. And while the final result was a 3-3 tie, no one who saw the game was left disappointed. This exhibition of skill was hockey at its finest, and it set the bar for what was to follow as the sport began its global expansion.

“Simply said this is one of the best hockey books written since Ken Dryden’s The Game and Dryden and Roy MacGregor’s Home Game.”– Peterborough Examiner

“A masterful job.”– Montreal Gazette

“A tense yet thrilling tale.”– Winnipeg Free Press