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The Haunting of Hip Hop

The Haunting of Hip Hop

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Add This - The Haunting of Hip Hop

Written by Bertice BerryAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Bertice Berry

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 240 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Broadway Books
  • On Sale: August 13, 2002
  • Price: $15.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-7679-1212-9 (0-7679-1212-8)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Now In Paperback.

In ancient West Africa, the drum was more than a musical instrument, it was a vehicle of communication–it conveyed information, told stories, and passed on the wisdom of generations. The magic of the drum remains alive today, and with her memsmerizing second novel, Berry brings those powerful beats to the streets of Harlem.

Harry “Freedom” Hudson is the hottest hip hop producer in New York City, earning unbelievable fees for his tunes and the innovative sound that puts his artists on the top of the charts. Harry is used to getting what he wants, so when he’s irresistibly drawn to a house in Harlem, he assumes he’ll be moving in as soon as the papers can be drawn up.

When Harry’s strong-willed, no-nonsense agent opens the front door, she finds an eerie, silent group of black people, young and old, gathered around a man holding an ancient African drum. They are waiting for Harry and bear a warning that touches his very soul: “We gave the drum back to your generation in the form of rap, but it’s being used to send the wrong message.”

The Haunting of Hip Hop is a reminder of the importance of honoring the past as a means of moving safely and firmly into the future. It is sure to raise eyebrows and stir up controversy about the impact, good and bad, of rap culture.